14. Employment Rights

The company reports on how it complies with nationally and internationally recognised standards relating to employee rights as well as on how it fosters staff involvement in the company and in sustainability management, what goals it has set itself in this regard, what results it has achieved thus far and where it sees risks.

As a public-sector company, Hamburg Messe und Congress GmbH (HMC) is fully aware of the responsibility it bears for the city of Hamburg and its region. HMC is committed to ensuring fair, just and respectful interaction with its employees.  

Occupational safety is a matter of great importance to HMC. HMC is constantly working on protecting its employees as effectively as possible while minimising the number of accidents or eliminating them altogether.

HMC will continue making every effort to protect its employees against hazards and accidents through measures such as on-site training using the sam® e-learning system. All (100%) employees are required to take these on-site training courses on a regular basis.

A company can only operate sustainably and successfully as long as its employees remain healthy. To ensure the long-term well-being of our team, HMC has introduced a multifaceted health management programme. For example, the internal HMC-Academy offers stress prevention courses. In addition, HMC regularly holds Health Days which provide instructions on physical exercise and healthy nutrition. Staff sport groups, medical care by the company physician, company-owned bicycles and support for active participation in a variety of athletic events complete the picture. Another health-related initiative is the annual free influenza immunisation campaign.

A good work-life balance is the very basis for long-term health and well-being. Therefore, HMC offers a flexible working time scheme which includes flextime, part-time and remote working arrangements. Employees may also take a sabbatical if desired. In 2020, 232 employees were working full-time and 81 employees were working part-time. Because of the pandemic, all employees were able to work remotely, at least temporarily. No sabbaticals were taken.  

HMC's work arrangements help employees reconcile their family duties with their job responsibilities and allow parents to perform their professional tasks more easily. These efforts have earned HMC the Hamburg Family Seal award several times.  

During the pandemic year 2020, protecting the health of the workforce was the top priority at HMC. The pandemic, which brought the entire event business to a complete halt, harboured the risk of layoffs. By applying the Collective Agreement Governing Short-Time Work For Members Of The Federation Of Municipal Employer Associations (TV COVID) as well as the COVID-19 Applied Collective Agreement (Anwendungstarifvertrag COVID 19) in conjunction with the Company COVID-19 Short-Time Agreement, employment relationships at HMC where protected in an optimal way. A shut-down of operations in April 2020 and the initiation of short-time work from May 2020 secured and protected the jobs at HMC. Furthermore, all affected employees were quickly provided with the means required for remote work. The HMC crisis management group is in charge of ensuring that hygiene rules and occupational safety and health measures, such as social distancing, are adapted to changing conditions whenever appropriate. As of 2021, additional preventive measures will be taken to guide employees healthily through the coronavirus pandemic. For example, employees will be offered regular testing as well as a programme to enhance physical resilience.

© Hamburg Messe und Congress / Michael Zapf
"Being close also works with two meters between each other" © Hamburg Messe und Congress / Michael Zapf

HMC is committed to enabling and maintaining a transparent, open flow of communication with its employees. Regular newsletters, a bulletin board and the company intranet are all available to employees as sources of comprehensive, relevant, current information. Contact persons for all matters are announced so employees know at all times where to turn with their concerns. Employee interests are advocated by the works council and the trade union. Throughout the pandemic, communication with employees was kept alive through initiatives such as digital town-hall-meetings and digital works meetings.

The German Minimum Wage Act (Mindestlohngesetz, MiLoG) went into effect on 01 January 2015, and the current Free and Hanseatic City of Hamburg (FHH) Collective Agreement took effect on 02 March 2019.  HMC pays its employees at least the statutory minimum wage and fully complies with the stipulations of MiLoG.

As a wholly-owned subsidiary of the Free and Hanseatic City of Hamburg (FHH) HMC additionally commits to awarding public contracts for construction and other services exclusively to contractors who agree in writing, at the time they submit a proposal, to compensate their employees for the work to be rendered at least as stipulated in Section 5 of the Hamburg Minimum Wage Act or in the applicable, mandatory collective agreement under the German Posted Workers Act.

HMC does business internationally through its International Events (Auslandsveranstaltungen) department. HMC organises joint exhibition stands (German pavilions) at international trade fairs world-wide. HMC's International Department has comprehensive trade fair experience on five continents, offering a full range of services from a single source, from taking care of all preparations in Germany through to overseeing the exhibition activities at the fair site. HMC supports exhibitors on site before and during international events, including stand assembly activities, ensuring that everything is ready at the proper time. All applicable employee rights are complied with as a matter of principle. During official German joint trade fair engagements (with German ministries as the principal), HMC's International Department staffs information areas and lounges with hosts and hostesses subject to German employment standards, such as maximum working hours, breaks etc. International staff whose selection is outside of HMC's influence (e. g. those working for stand construction companies) are typically national or regional contractors selected by the relevant federal ministries in an RFP process, applying appropriate selection criteria.

Also refer to: Our Contribution to The United Nations’ 17 Sustainable Development Goals

15. Equal Opportunities

The company discloses in what way it has implemented national and international processes and what goals it has for the promotion of equal opportunities and diversity, occupational health and safety, participation rights, the integration of migrants and people with disabilities, fair pay as well as a work-life balance and how it will achieve these.

Equal treatment and openness for diversity characterise a culture of just, fair and mutually respectful interaction in a spirit of cooperation among all people on the job.

Hamburg Messe und Congress GmbH (HMC) adopted Diversity as one of its guiding principles as early as 2008. Diversity and equal opportunities are key goals pursued by all Human Resources functions at HMC. These efforts prioritise equal professional opportunities for women and men as well as inclusion of people with disabilities. Furthermore, HMC places emphasis on ensuring a good work-life balance.  

HMC has joined the German "Diversity Charter", thereby committing to creating a working environment that is free of prejudice and discrimination on the basis of sex, religion, sexual identity, nationality, ethnic or social origin or convictions. HMC employs people from more than 10 different nations across all age groups. Showing mutual respect and valuing each individual are principles that define how people treat each other at HMC. To reflect this in spoken and written communication while implementing gender-sensitive language at HMC, Corporate Communications will gradually take steps to raise awareness and promote inclusion at this level as elsewhere. The corporate website currently includes a 'gender-note’.

For the same purposes HMC employs an Equality Officer.

In addition, all employees are required to participate in regular training on the German General Equal Treatment Act (AGG) and the Code of Conduct.

For its active commitment to these principles, HMC received the "Helga Stödter Award for Mixed Leadership” from the Hamburg Chamber of Commerce in 2015. HMC was lauded for its high share of female employees in management positions, among other criteria. The Supervisory Board consists of five women and seven men in compliance with the Hamburg Act For The Equal Treatment Of Women And Men In Public Service (Hamburgisches Gesetz zur Gleichstellung von Frauen und Männern im öffentlichen Dienst, Gleichstellungsgesetz-HmbGleiG), which aims to ensure a share of at least 40% of women employees. In addition, HMC is constantly developing new working arrangements to help employees reconcile their family with their job responsibilities, for example by offering remote work, an adaptable flextime system, and part-time schemes so parents can fulfil their professional duties more easily. These efforts have earned HMC the Hamburg Family Seal award several times.

During the revitalisation of the new CCH – Congress Center Hamburg a barrier-free architectural design concept based on current standards (DIN 18040) was defined jointly with representatives of organisations dedicated to promoting inclusion. To achieve a barrier-free congress building, HMC implemented a ‘multi-sensory’ concept throughout the building. This includes features such as stair-free access, reduced counter and handrail heights, a floor-integrated guiding system, and automated stairs and platform lifts. Furthermore, key information panels in Braille and tactile profile lettering have been installed to assist visually impaired and blind persons.  

Fair compensation is something HMC considers as a matter of course. HMC is committed to complying with the German Minimum Wage Law (Mindestlohngesetz, MiLoG) for all employees as well as all cooperating companies (refer to Criterion 14).

HMC believes that the satisfaction of its workforce as evidenced in the employee survey, along with the awards received for its employee-friendly policies, indicate that these goals have been achieved successfully.

Also refer to: Our Contribution to The United Nations’ 17 Sustainable Development Goals

16. Qualifications

The company discloses what goals it has set and what measures it has taken to promote the employability of all employees, i.e. the ability of all employees to participate in the working and professional world, and in view of adapting to demographic change, and where risks are seen.

Training young talent is the foundation of any stable, sustainably-operating company. As a public-sector company and part of the business community in the Free and Hanseatic City of Hamburg (FHH), HMC has been actively supporting young people's professional development by providing them with training opportunities for many years. At any given time, there are approximately 18 trainees at HMC who work in five different technical and commercial disciplines. Every year HMC hires six former trainees on average as permanent employees. In addition, HMC offers internships to university students studying in combined work-while-studying programmes, including specialised thesis tutoring where desired.

This is one of the reasons HMC has earned the "5-Star Seal" in the competition "Hamburg's Best Companies For Trainees" on several occasions. Since 2020, trainees have been able to participate in the Energy Scouts project offered by the Hamburg Chamber Of Commerce. This opens up further education opportunities in the field of energy and resource efficiency / preservation which aims to build awareness of matters at the interface of technology and ecology. HMC trainees carried out a project called “Ist der Energieverbrauch im Keller” (paraphrased: When Energy Consumption Hits Rock Bottom), which dealt with retrofitting LED lights in the exhibition halls and earned them second place in a competition. Fostering young talents is an important task considering the ageing population in our society.
© Hamburg Messe und Congress
Energy-Scouts and their trainer with the management team © Hamburg Messe und Congress

HMC places great emphasis on strengthening the individual skills of all employees while supporting their personal development continually. This led to the establishment of the HMC-Academy which, apart from promoting health, has become HMC's core resource for personnel development. Every year it offers a multifaceted catalogue of training opportunities tailored to suit the given needs. With the advisory support of experienced personnel development experts, HMC offers volunteer training courses imparting technical soft skills, organisational methodologies or negotiation skills, leadership workshops, stress management classes and much more (for the number of hours of training and further education programmes refer to KPI GRI SRS-404-1).

Since digitalisation and Social Media are often challenging for older employees, there is a growing need for appropriate skills. Several new training courses are dedicated specifically to these two topics to make sure all employees are sufficiently qualified to handle new trends in their personal and professional lives. Examples include: To better evaluate these further education programmes, HMC plans to implement a suitable assessment tool. The goal for 2020 was for the HMC Academy to offer 21 elective further education courses. Under pandemic conditions it was possible to hold seven of them digitally.

Apart from offering non-compulsory training courses, HMC expects employees to take regular online courses addressing relevant topics such as data privacy, fire protection, occupational safety, general non-discrimination etc. These and other subject matters are being taught on a regular basis using the business training tool sam®. All (100%) employees are under obligation to take these training courses on a regular basis. This helps ensure the highest levels of safety and employability for HMC's staff. Compliance with training requirements is monitored by supervisors. In 2020 the compliance quota was at 62.5 %. To improve this relatively low participation rate, several measures have been taken, such as setting-up an automated reminder feature and notifying supervisors about inadequate compliance so they can encourage participation. From 2021 the e-learning tool sam® and the HMC-Academy will both provide training and seminars on the basics of operational sustainability.

Whenever HMC is able to hire its former trainees as qualified, enthusiastic future employees, this helps mitigate the risks inherent in the demographic shift while ensuring high-quality skill sets through providing optimal support to young talents. The Energy Scouts program encourages young employees to support the more experienced ones in addressing an especially urgent concern, thereby enhancing intergenerational collaboration.

As for safety and health management, other risks are overcome by HMC’s meticulous tracking and updating its regular, mandatory training curriculum. To ensure compliant conduct on company premises, HMC underpins its training programmes by providing relevant fact sheets on the intranet, which can likewise help prevent accidents. The safety of employees as well as service and other business partners is a top priority at HMC. It is ensured by implementing continuous qualification programmes.

Another risk, employee dissatisfaction, would be reflected by a high staff turnover. In 2019, the employee turnover figure for all of Germany as published by the Federal Labour Agency was more than 33%, expressed as the average of all employment relationships initiated and terminated relative to the total number of existing employment relationships subject to social insurance contributions during the year. At HMC, employee turnover was as low as 3.8% in 2019 (not counting trainees or persons on long-term sick leave). This justifies assuming a high level of employee satisfaction, which was further confirmed in an employee survey 2019. The next such survey is planned for 2023.  

Also refer to: Our Contribution to The United Nations’ 17 Sustainable Development Goals

Key Performance Indicators to criteria 14 to 16

Key Performance Indicator GRI SRS-403-9: Work-related injuries
The reporting organization shall report the following information:

a. For all employees:
i. The number and rate of fatalities as a result of work-related injury;
ii. The number and rate of high-consequence work-related injuries (excluding fatalities);
iii. The number and rate of recordable work-related injuries;
iv. The main types of work-related injury;
v. The number of hours worked.

b. For all workers who are not employees but whose work and/or workplace is controlled by the organization:
i. The number and rate of fatalities as a result of work-related injury;
ii. The number and rate of high-consequence work-related injuries (excluding fatalities);
iii. The number and rate of recordable work-related injuries;
iv. The main types of work-related injury;
v. The number of hours worked.

You will find the remaining numbers c-g of the indicator SRS 403-9 in the GRI standard and may additionally report them here.


Key Performance Indicator GRI SRS-403-10: Work-related ill health
The reporting organization shall report the following information:

a. For all employees:
i. The number of fatalities as a result of work-related ill health;
ii. The number of cases of recordable work-related ill health;
iii. The main types of work-related ill health.
b. For all workers who are not employees but whose work and/or workplace is controlled by the organization:
i. The number of fatalities as a result of work-related ill health;
ii. The number of cases of recordable work-related ill health;
iii. The main types of work-related ill health.

You will find the remaining numbers c-e of the indicator SRS 403-10 in the GRI standard and may additionally report them here.

Work-Related Injuries Work-related invalidities:

Key Performance Indicator GRI SRS-403-4: Worker participation on occupational health and safety
The reporting organization shall report the following information for employees and for workers who are not employees but whose work and/or workplace is controlled by the organization:

a. A description of the processes for worker participation and consultation in the development, implementation, and evaluation of the occupational health and safety management system, and for providing access to and communicating relevant information on occupational health and safety to workers.

b. Where formal joint management–worker health and safety committees exist, a description of their responsibilities, meeting frequency, decision-making authority, and whether and, if so, why any workers are not represented by these committees.

Both internal and external employees were consulted for the hazard assessment of technical equipment. For the years 2019/2020, this includes: In addition, general information on occupational safety (mainly in connection with the coronavirus pandemic) was distributed to all employees. General information is also posted on-site in buildings. Each individual employee was trained using the e-learning tool sam®. Of two planned classroom training courses on operating working platforms, only one could be carried out due to the pandemic. Every year, all external service partners receive an advisory notice instructing them to comply with general requirements and regulations. They are required to return to HMC a written statement confirming the receipt of the notice, and related instruction of their staff.  

Occupational health and safety meetings take place at quarterly intervals. They are attended by the members of the executive board, safety managers, safety officers, Human Resources, the works council as well as various facility and group managers from the technical departments at the Exhibition and CCH divisions.

Key Performance Indicator GRI SRS-404-1: Average hours of training
The reporting organization shall report the following information:

a. Average hours of training that the organization’s employees have undertaken during the reporting period, by:
i. gender;
ii. employee category.

In 2020, the average hours of training and further education per employee is 4.9 hours. The reason for this is the coronavirus pandemic and the resulting education funding cuts. All employees participated in internal or external education and training courses. (Please note: Following a transition to digital formats, employees were able to participate in several training courses.)  

Key Performance Indicator GRI SRS-405-1: Diversity
The reporting organization shall report the following information:

a. Percentage of individuals within the organization’s governance bodies in each of the following diversity categories:
i. Gender;
ii. Age group: under 30 years old, 30-50 years old, over 50 years old;
iii. Other indicators of diversity where relevant (such as minority or vulnerable groups).

b. Percentage of employees per employee category in each of the following diversity categories:
i. Gender;
ii. Age group: under 30 years old, 30-50 years old, over 50 years old;
iii. Other indicators of diversity where relevant (such as minority or vulnerable groups).

HMC has 332 employees (including employees on parental leave and long-term invalids). These include two corporate executives (both male), 34 managers, and 22 trainees.    

Gender ratio (according to full-time equivilents):
209 female (63%)
123 male (37%)                                                           

As per 31 December 2020, HMC employs 124 full-time equivalents among women, and 110 full-time equivalents among men. Accordingly, the share of female full-time equivalents is 52.9 %.                                               
Age structure and distribution:                                  
Below 20: 1.8 %                                                       
20-29: 10.8 %                                                           
30-39: 24.1 %                                                        
40-49: 27.4 %                                                        
50-54: 16.6 %                                                         
55-59: 9.6 %                                                        
Above 60: 9.6 %                                                             

The HMC staff includes a total of 14 women in leadership roles, or 12.88 full-time equivalents. There are a total of 20 men in leadership positions, or 20 full-time equivalents. The share of female management-level employees is 39.18 % of the full-time equivalents. The Supervisory Board consists of five women and seven men in compliance with the Hamburg Act For The Equal Treatment Of Women And Men In Public Service (Hamburgisches Gesetz zur Gleichstellung von Frauen und Männern im öffentlichen Dienst, Gleichstellungsgesetz-HmbGleiG).  

In 2020 the ratio of severely disabled employees was 4.45 %. This is equivalent to an average 14.8 employees with a disability. Whenever required, the statutory equalisation fees in accordance with the German Severely Handicapped Act are paid.

Key Performance Indicator GRI SRS-406-1: Incidents of discrimination
The reporting organization shall report the following information:

a. Total number of incidents of discrimination during the reporting period.

b. Status of the incidents and actions taken with reference to the following:
i. Incident reviewed by the organization;
ii. Remediation plans being implemented;
iii. Remediation plans that have been implemented, with results reviewed through routine internal management review processes;
iv. Incident no longer subject to action.

There were no incidents of discrimination during the 2020 reporting period. Employees are free to contact the Equality Officer, Works Council or their superiors with any concerns.

17. Human Rights

The company discloses what measures it takes, strategies it pursues and targets it sets for itself and for the supply chain for ensuring that human rights are respected globally and that forced and child labour as well as all forms of exploitation are prevented. Information should also be provided on the results of the measures and on any relevant risks.

HMC's commitment in this context relates to Criterion 15, "Equal Opportunities".

As a public-sector organisation, HMC is committed to ensuring fair compensation (conforming to MiLoG), occupational safety and health, compliant business conduct, and privacy protection.

Striving to set a positive example, HMC considers it as absolutely essential to comply with all human rights. As a member country of the European Union and the United Nations, the Federal Republic of Germany has committed to the observance of human rights in international, multilateral treaties. Compliance with German law therefore implies adherence to human rights. Therefore, HMC does not see any current risk of human rights violations in the course of its business activities. HMC expects its business partners to demonstrate the same commitment as a basis for long-term cooperation. It is one of HMC's permanent goals to review its existing and new contracts on a regular basis and counting unfavourable aspects as more severe factors when selecting new business associates. When making relevant decisions, HMC uses the Hamburg Tendering Act (HmbVgG) and the "Guidance For Ecologically Responsible Procurement” (German only) as guidance. No quantitative goals are being sent, apart from an unconditional commitment to compliance with applicable law.

Please also refer to: “Our Contribution to The United Nations’ 17 Sustainable Development Goals

Key Performance Indicators to criteria 17

Key Performance Indicator GRI SRS-412-3: Investment agreements subject to human rights screenings
The reporting organization shall report the following information:

a. Total number and percentage of significant investment agreements and contracts that include human rights clauses or that underwent human rights screening.

b. The definition used for ‘significant investment agreements’.

As a public-sector company HMC is committed to complying with all legal obligations set forth by the Senate of the City of Hamburg. Applicable human rights-related laws and regulations include, without limitation, the General Data Protection Regulation (GDPR), the German Minimum Wage Law (Mindestlohngesetz, MiLoG), the Hamburg Tendering Act (HmbVgG) and others. HMC has had a Data Protection Officer since 1999.  

Since the coming into force of MiLoG, HMC, as a subsidiary of FHH, has awarded public contracts for construction and other services as well as public service concessions exclusively to contractors who signed an appropriate agreement when submitting their tender, pursuant to Section 3 of the Hamburg Tendering Act (HmbVgG).  

The most recent random audit of individual service contract awards for the years 2017/2018 was conducted by the Internal Auditing Department in 2019. This audit confirmed that the contracts had in essence been awarded lawfully. As a result, a "Self Declaration of Compliance with Minimum Wage Provisions" became a binding clause of all contracts, rather than a separate standard document as in the past. Furthermore, contractors were requested to submit appropriate proofs of compliance. 80 % complied. Audits are carried out regularly.  

HMC's own Self-Declaration has been published on the HMC website under "The company / Corporate Social Responsibility / Declaration on minimum wages".
HMC did not transact any investments in 2020 that required human rights auditing.

Key Performance Indicator GRI SRS-412-1: Operations subject to human rights reviews
The reporting organization shall report the following information:

a. Total number and percentage of operations that have been subject to human rights reviews or human rights impact assessments, by country.

HMC operates a single place of business (Messeplatz 1, 20357 Hamburg) and no other sites. Regarding audits, please refer to GRI SRS-412-3.

Key Performance Indicator GRI SRS-414-1: New suppliers subject to social screening
The reporting organization shall report the following information:

a. Percentage of new suppliers that were screened using social criteria.

When selecting services, social criteria are duly considered.

For contracts for work and services, new business partners must complete and sign a Deed Of Release / Self-Declaration Of Compliance With Minimum Wage Provisions.

In 2019, the Internal Auditing Department conducted a review whether all contractual partners had submitted this declaration. Furthermore, contractors were requested to submit appropriate proofs of compliance. 80 % complied. Please refer to GRI SRS-412-3.

Key Performance Indicator GRI SRS-414-2: Social impacts in the supply chain
The reporting organization shall report the following information:

a. Number of suppliers assessed for social impacts.

b. Number of suppliers identified as having significant actual and potential negative social impacts.

c. Significant actual and potential negative social impacts identified in the supply chain.

d. Percentage of suppliers identified as having significant actual and potential negative social impacts with which improvements were agreed upon as a result of assessment.

e. Percentage of suppliers identified as having significant actual and potential negative social impacts with which relationships were terminated as a result of assessment, and why.

HMC adheres to the "Guidance For Ecologically Responsible Procurement” (German only) issued by the City of Hamburg.

This means that when selecting potential contractors, HMC gives preference to regional providers (such as caterers or office supply companies) wherever this is economically feasible. Furthermore, the most recent screening of HMC's service contractors with multi-year contracts (for services such as cleaning, stand construction, security etc.) for their sustainability strategies was conducted in 2019.
No negative social consequences were found to result from their activities.

18. Corporate Citizenship

The company discloses how it contributes to corporate citizenship in the regions in which it conducts its core business activities.

As a wholly-owned subsidiary of the Free and Hanseatic City of Hamburg (FHH), Hamburg Messe und Congress GmbH is fully aware of its special significance and responsibility. HMC takes this responsibility conscientiously within the region and beyond.

HMC places great emphasis on acting on its social responsibility. HMC employees have supported the "herz as – hoffnungsorte Hamburg” foundation with donations and volunteer services in cases of need since 2008. “herz as” is a place of hope for homeless people where they can turn to. Homeless people can call there anonymously and use a variety of services including consulting.

In addition, HMC has been cooperating with the "Hamburger Tafel e. V." network of food banks for several years. During the trade fair INTERNORGA exhibitors are given the opportunity to donate food.

Apart from trainee positions, HMC offers internship positions to university students year-round. If so requested, interns are given expert advice in support of their final theses.

HMC is a key economic factor for the region [refer to Criterion 2]. This was confirmed by a study conducted by the Munich-based ifo Institute of Economic Research in 2016.

What is more, sustainability is one of the selection criteria when choosing service partners. HMC's catering partner largely relies on organically grown, regional and seasonal foodstuffs.

Finally, employees participate in sports events with a sustainable background with great enthusiasm. For example, HMC organises teams for joint, free participation in the MOPO team relay race or the initiative "Stadtradeln – Radeln für ein gutes Klima" (City Cycling – Cycling For A Good Climate).

Please also refer to: “Our Contribution to The United Nations’ 17 Sustainable Development Goals

Key Performance Indicators to criteria 18

Key Performance Indicator GRI SRS-201-1: Direct economic value generated and distributed
The reporting organization shall report the following information:

a. Direct economic value generated and distributed (EVG&D) on an accruals basis, including the basic components for the organization’s global operations as listed below. If data are presented on a cash basis, report the justification for this decision in addition to reporting the following basic components:
i. Direct economic value generated: revenues;
ii. Economic value distributed: operating costs, employee wages and benefits, payments to providers of capital, payments to government by country, and community investments;
iii. Economic value retained: ‘direct economic value generated’ less ‘economic value distributed’.

b. Where significant, report EVG&D separately at country, regional, or market levels, and the criteria used for defining significance.

Information about direct economic value generated and distributed by HMC can be found in the relevant business reports of Hamburg Messe und Congress GmbH (HMC) and its shareholder, HGV.

19. Political Influence

All significant input relating to legislative procedures, all entries in lobby lists, all significant payments of membership fees, all contributions to governments as well as all donations to political parties and politicians should be disclosed by country in a differentiated way.

As a public sector organisation which is always in the public eye, Hamburg Messe und Congress GmbH (HMC) operates according to the rules of its political environment. HMC is determined to maintain and strengthen its positive image. It conducts its business based on applicable legal stipulations, the rules of peaceful coexistence, and ethical standards, all of which impose a wide range of obligations on the organisation and its employees.

Therefore, in fulfilling its public obligations, HMC contributes to the implementation of the political goals of the Senate of Hamburg. Some of the most important guidelines to be implemented at this time include the Climate Protection Act / Climate Protection Plan and the Hamburg Code of Corporate Governance (HCGK). In pursuit of these goals, HMC remains committed to sustainability and the reduction of CO2 emissions.

Furthermore, the stipulations of the 2017 version of the Industrial Waste Ordinance (Gewerbeabfallverordnung, GewAbfV) are relevant with regard to the obligation to separate, recycle and pre-treat waste from commercial operations. The underlying goal is to improve the reuse of waste from events. Additional relevant legal stipulations HMC complies with include the German Minimum Wage Law (Mindestlohngesetz, MiLoG) and the Hamburg Tendering Act (HmbVgG).

To ensure future compliance with legal requirements and their effects on HMC's development, HMC maintains a constant dialogue with the Free and Hanseatic City of Hamburg (FHH) and its authorities. HMC places great emphasis on creating and maintaining a cooperative and open relationship with all relevant authorities.

As a public sector organisation, HMC is generally subject to a zero political donations policy. This precludes any political influence-taking through political party donations. This principle is part of the Corporate Compliance Programme.

HMC's interests as a trade fair organisation are mainly represented by AUMA, the Exhibition and Trade Fair Board of the German Industry (Ausstellungs- und Messeausschuss der Deutschen Wirtschaft e. V.), one of the key representatives in the political sphere.

Other relevant association memberships include:
Also refer to: Our Contribution to The United Nations’ 17 Sustainable Development Goals

Key Performance Indicators to criteria 19

Key Performance Indicator GRI SRS-415-1: Political contributions
The reporting organization shall report the following information:

a. Total monetary value of financial and in-kind political contributions made directly and indirectly by the organization by country and recipient/beneficiary.

b. If applicable, how the monetary value of in-kind contributions was estimated.

Zero political donations policy, a constituent part of the Corporate Compliance Programme: As a wholly-owned subsidiary of FHH, Hamburg Messe und Congress GmbH (HMC) does not make any (political) donations, whether nationally or international.

20. Conduct that Complies with the Law and Policy

The company discloses which measures, standards, systems and processes are in place to prevent unlawful conduct and, in particular, corruption, how they are verified, which results have been achieved to date and where it sees there to be risks. The company depicts how corruption and other contraventions in the company are prevented and exposed and what sanctions are imposed.

Compliance includes adherence to all laws, regulations and guidelines as well as all applicable contractual obligations. The term Compliance denotes that every single individual, from employees and the Executive Board to the Supervisory Board, the Principal, and through to suppliers, exhibitors and visitors, is expected to follow all applicable legal stipulations in the course of business. HMC consequently respects applicable laws and expect its employees and business partners to do the same.

To combat and prevent corruption and other unlawful conduct, the HMC Executive Board introduced a Compliance Management System (CMS) comprising the Corporate Compliance Programme, regular training courses, a Compliance Officer and other measures.

In March 2020, the Hamburg Senate Committee for Public Sector Organisations passed a Compliance Guideline for public-sector companies. The Compliance Guideline is a logical extension of the obligatory Hamburg Code Of Corporate Governance (HCGK) which has been in effect since 2009.

Furthermore, compliance and anticorruption are expressly included in the applicable collective labour agreement (TV-AVH, Section 3(2)):
"Employees are prohibited from accepting any rewards, gifts, commissions or other favours in connection with their work. No exceptions are permissible unless expressly approved by the employer. Any employee who is offered such a favour is under obligation to notify the employer without delay."

Since many different parties interact in the context of an event, there is a certain risk of non-compliance and corruption. HMC counteracts this risk by ensuring transparency, providing sources of information, and consulting with its Legal Department.

All employees receive regular compliance and anticorruption training through the e-learning system sam®. The Compliance Programme and the Operations Manual are freely available to all employees on the intranet, true to the concept that knowledge and accountability are keys to success. Both arise from strict obedience to the law and ethical conduct. It takes regular study of the subject to build the required awareness and sensitivity.

All employees are required to report violations of the Corporate Compliance Programme and other applicable provisions to their supervisors or the Compliance Officer without delay (duty to report). Violations may be reported anonymously.

HMC will ensure that no employee will suffer any reprisals as a consequence of reporting a violation. Supervisors are required to conduct regular checks proactively and engage in conversations with their employees.

Violations may be penalised in a variety of ways, including reprimands, claims for damages, and through to termination.

The ultimate goals of compliance are to minimise risks and damage to the organisation and to increase the efficiency of operations.

In summary, Compliance at HMC is implemented by:
Also refer to: Our Contribution to The United Nations’ 17 Sustainable Development Goals

Key Performance Indicators to criteria 20

Key Performance Indicator GRI SRS-205-1: Operations assesed for risks related to corruption
The reporting organization shall report the following information:

a. Total number and percentage of operations assessed for risks related to corruption.

b. Significant risks related to corruption identified through the risk assessment.

HMC has two corporate divisions, the trade fair division Hamburg Messe (HM) and the Congress Center Hamburg (CCH). The CCH is currently undergoing revitalisation and not operational. Therefore there are currently no risks associated with the CCH. The Hamburg Messe division is subject to periodic audits as part of the multi-year revolving auditing schedule of the Internal Auditing Department which includes Compliance and Anticorruption. No major corruption risks have been found to date.

Key Performance Indicator GRI SRS-205-3: Incidents of corruption
Die berichtende Organisation muss über folgende Informationen berichten:

a. Total number and nature of confirmed incidents of corruption.

b. Total number of confirmed incidents in which employees were dismissed or disciplined for corruption.

c. Total number of confirmed incidents when contracts with business partners were terminated or not renewed due to violations related to corruption.

d. Public legal cases regarding corruption brought against the organization or its employees during the reporting period and the outcomes of such cases.

There was no corruption case in the year 2020. The Employment Contract, Collective Labour Agreement and HMC Corporate Compliance Programme prohibit employees from requesting, accepting, offering or granting any personal favours that are directly or indirectly linked to their professional duties, in particular in the context of initiating a business deal, or awarding or executing a contract, whether with a private individual, a business or a legal entity under public law.

Key Performance Indicator GRI SRS-419-1: Non-compliance with laws and regulations
The reporting organization shall report the following information:

a. Significant fines and non-monetary sanctions for non-compliance with laws and/or regulations in the social and economic area in terms of:
i. total monetary value of significant fines;
ii. total number of non-monetary sanctions;
iii. cases brought through dispute resolution mechanisms.

b. If the organization has not identified any non-compliance with laws and/or regulations, a brief statement of this fact is sufficient.

c. The context against which significant fines and non-monetary sanctions were incurred.

HMC was not penalised with any fines or non-monetary sanctions in 2020. For non-compliance cases please also refer to: "GRI SRS-205-3: Incidents of Corruption".