11. Usage of Natural Resources

The company discloses the extent to which natural resources are used for the company’s business activities. Possible options here are materials, the input and output of water, soil, waste, energy, land and biodiversity as well as emissions for the life cycles of products and services.

See Fenix Way page 14 and following as well as CSR Report 2021, pages 13-17 for amount of natural resources used.

Our core business is equipping people with goods that allow them to spend more time in nature. We also want to become a net contributor to a quality environment. This leads to a thoughtful choice in materials and a consulting service to our customers regarding adequate and not overengineered equipment choices. The basis for our care for the environment is to apply a precautionary approach, and to think in terms of closed-loop systems and looking at the full life-cycle of a product or service. We are constantly in search of innovative solutions that reduce our impact on the environment, increase our resource efficiency, and move us closer to a zero-impact, closed-loop production process.

As a producer and retailer, we are in need of a variety of natural resources. Our most material natural resources are the natural raw materials our products consist of (including biodiversity and animal welfare aspects) as well as the energy and water needed for our products' production and waste generated along the whole value chain and within our retail business.

We are aware that the garment industry has a major impact on the planet’s water basins, water quality and availability. So far, we are not able to assess our total water footprint. The data sets for our operations and our suppliers were still fragmented in 2021. As in previous years, this is mainly because some operations have a vast green space that they take care of, or some of our megastores carry pools and diving tubes for equipment testing, while others are located in inner cities or industrial areas and hence do not need water for parks or landscaped surroundings. The water we withdraw is mainly drawn from the community supply (groundwater, with some surface water in northern Finland, South Korea, China and Czech Republic). In some locations we tap lake or river water where it is abundant and clean. The main purpose is for drinking, cooking and household use. Most of the effluents were collected in community sewers and treated at a public treatment plant. No toxic chemicals were released by our own operations into sewers or surface water bodies. 

We continue to improve the ecological profile of the materials we use. As in earlier years, we deliberately use recycled, organic, ecological, biodegradable or recyclable materials. For the whole Group, about half of our materials for textile and hardware production are more sustainably sourced. All our brands apply the Higg Index criteria wherever possible.

While exploring new grounds and walking through nature with our products, we constantly follow a simple but effective motto: ‘repair, reuse, recycle, rethink’. Here, our warehouses fulfil various functions: they are places to return broken or unwanted products and to store products that have been called back from the markets. In addition, the warehouses play an important role in collecting and separating our different waste streams and thus also our reclaimed and recycled packaging waste, as per legal requirement. While some locations handle waste based on weight, others do so by volume while smaller ones only pay a lump sum for the various bins or collectors they use. Therefore, overall datasets are not reliable as the waste management is local and often cannot be compared among the different entities.

12. Resource Management

The company discloses what qualitative and quantitative goals it has set itself with regard to its resource efficiency, in particular its use of renewables, the increase in raw material productivity and the reduction in the usage of ecosystem services, which measures and strategies it is pursuing to this end, how these are or will be achieved, and where it sees there to be risks.

The principles of understanding what we are doing and how we can do better forms part of the 2025 strategy for all of our brands and retail business (see Fenix Way, pages 40 and following). For the new strategy, 2019 was chosen as a baseline year as newly acquired companies have been integrated to full extent as well as the past strategy period ended (which is also true for the overall company strategic framework). During the development process of the new Fenix Way, Fenix Outdoor also updates the impact and risk analysis, which was conducted for the first time in 2012, when Fenix Outdoor started with its sustainability program.

Fenix Outdoor and its entities jointly base their actions on the following key aspects:


As the industry is rapidly evolving and demands for sustainable materials do increase, we see a major risk in the availability of those materials on the market (e.g. cotton) for medium and small-sized enterprises. At the same time, the demand for specific materials (e.g. polyester) can't be met by more sustainable materials and thus non-renewable sources are still highly present. To become less dependent and to create positive change in the market, we invest in innovative, more sustainable materials (e.g. recovered wool).

The policy is developed, approved, and signed by the Fenix first-level management team. Progress reports are delivered quarterly in a direct reporting line to the chairman.

The central CSR team is in charge of monitoring the progress against the strategy. This is mainly done through the annual CSR reporting but also during the year in regular CSR team calls and jour fixes. With respect to the past strategy period, performance tracking is not possible due to the steady growth of the company and thus yearly data that cannot be compared to each other on a fairly basis.

Our total energy consumption increased by 13% compared to 2020. However, it is important to bare in mind that a big part of the saving in 2020 came from a reduction in operating hours due to the corona restrictions (especially store and office closure). Because of re-openings and expanded travel activities, the CO2 and energy consumption partly increased. Further developments are among other (see p. 21 CSR report):
- increase from 1,86t (2020) to 1,98t (2021) CO2e per capita
- decrease from 48 H2O m3 (2020) to 29 H2O m3 (2021) per capita

Key Performance Indicators to criteria 11 to 12

Key Performance Indicator GRI SRS-301-1: Materials used
The reporting organization shall report the following information:

a. Total weight or volume of materials that are used to produce and package the organization’s primary products and services during the reporting period, by:
i. non-renewable materials used;
ii. renewable materials used.

See CSR Report 2021 page 15ff

Key Performance Indicator GRI SRS-302-1: Energy consumption
The reporting organization shall report the following information:

a. Total fuel consumption within the organization from non-renewable sources, in joules or multiples, and including fuel types used.

b. Total fuel consumption within the organization from renewable sources, in joules or multiples, and including fuel types used.

c. In joules, watt-hours or multiples, the total:
i. electricity consumption
ii. heating consumption
iii. cooling consumption
iv. steam consumption

d. In joules, watt-hours or multiples, the total:
i. electricity sold
ii. heating sold
iii. cooling sold
iv. steam sold

e. Total energy consumption within the organization, in joules or multiples.

f. Standards, methodologies, assumptions, and/or calculation tools used.

g. Source of the conversion factors used.

see page 21 CSR Report 2021

Key Performance Indicator GRI SRS-302-4: Reduction of energy consumption
The reporting organization shall report the following information:

a. Amount of reductions in energy consumption achieved as a direct result of conservation and efficiency initiatives, in joules or multiples.

b. Types of energy included in the reductions; whether fuel, electricity, heating, cooling, steam, or all.

c. Basis for calculating reductions in energy consumption, such as base year or baseline, including the rationale for choosing it.

d. Standards, methodologies, assumptions, and/or calculation tools used.

see page 21 CSR Report 2021

Key Performance Indicator GRI SRS-303-3: Water withdrawal
The reporting organization shall report the following information:

a. Total water withdrawal from all areas in megaliters, and a breakdown of this total by the following sources, if applicable:
i. Surface water;
ii. Groundwater;
iii. Seawater;
iv. Produced water;
v. Third-party water.

b. Total water withdrawal from all areas with water stress in megaliters, and a breakdown of this total by the following sources, if applicable:
i. Surface water;
ii. Groundwater;
iii. Seawater;
iv. Produced water;
v. Third-party water, and a breakdown of this total by the withdrawal sources listed in i-iv.

c. A breakdown of total water withdrawal from each of the sources listed in Disclosures 303-3-a and 303-3-b in megaliters by the following categories:
i. Freshwater (≤1,000 mg/L Total Dissolved Solids);
ii. Other water (>1,000 mg/L Total Dissolved Solids).

d. Any contextual information necessary to understand how the data have been compiled, such as any standards, methodologies, and assumptions used.

see page 15-16, CSR Report 2021

In our own operations, we do not discharge any wastewater that requires a Chemical Oxygen Demand (COD) monitoring, nor do we handle or use halogenated absorbing organic compounds, requiring an AOX demand monitoring. Our wastewater is like that of normal households. Our partner tanneries, down finisher, weavers and dye house operators are located in Germany, Croatia, Italy, Japan, South Korea, China and Vietnam. They operate their own treatment plants or are adjacent to industrial treatment plants. Our partners follow our Chemical Guidelines and in most cases use an environmentally preferred version of detergents or agents needed for cleaning or production. Public authorities regularly monitor the treatment plants of our partners: in Germany, Japan, Korea, China and Vietnam they mostly operate under the ISO 14001 system.

Key Performance Indicator GRI SRS-306-3: Waste generated
The reporting organization shall report the following information:

a. Total weight of waste generated in metric tons, and a breakdown of this total by composition of the waste.

b. Contextual information necessary to understand the data and how the data has been compiled.

see page 17-20 CSR Report 2021

13. Climate-Relevant Emissions

The company discloses the GHG emissions in accordance with the Greenhouse Gas (GHG) Protocol or standards based on it and states the goals it has set itself to reduce emissions, as well as its results thus far.

We at Fenix Outdoor did not stop working on our climate strategy and targets during the past year. We published internal GHG reports on brand, retail and common services level, helping us to identify areas for improvement, create action plans and integrate climate action further in our day-to-day business. We actively take part in the working groups within the UN Fashion Industry Charter for Climate Action (FICCA), the Swedish Textile Initiative for Climate Action (STICA) and the OIA’s Climate Action Corps. Considering our own operations and business activities in 2021, our overall carbon dioxide equivalents (t CO2 e) amounted to 113 115 t CO2 e (2020: 64 635 t). Our key climate-relevant emissions sources are energy consumption from our owned and operated locations, production of our products (esp. raw materials and energy consumption from our suppliers) as well as transport and distribution. Due to the complexity of our supply chain the main challenge is to make sure that emissions accounting is complete and specific. For example, the emissions from our purchased fabric need to be calculated based on average emission factors through the MSI. Another challenge is to implement reduction measures in the supply chain.

Our climate strategy covers two main goals:
We report our emissions for all Scopes in line with the GHG protocol.

Emission reduction efforts in 2021 include but are not limited to:

Key Performance Indicators to criteria 13

Key Performance Indicator GRI SRS-305-1: Direct (Scope 1) GHG emissions
The reporting organization shall report the following information:

a. Gross direct (Scope 1) GHG emissions in metric tons of CO2 equivalent.

b. Gases included in the calculation; whether CO2, CH4, N2O, HFCs, PFCs, SF6, NF3 or all.

c. Biogenic CO2 emissions in metric tons of CO2 equivalent.

d. Base year for the calculation, if applicable, including:
i. the rationale for choosing it;
ii. emissions in the base year;
iii. the context for any significant changes in emissions that triggered recalculations of base year emissions.

e. Source of the emission factors and the global warming potential (GWP) rates used, or a reference to the GWP source.

f. Consolidation approach for emissions; whether equity share, financial control, or operational control.

g. Standards, methodologies, assumptions, and/or calculation tools used.

see previous section and page 21, CSR Report 2021.

Key Performance Indicator GRI SRS-305-2: Energy indirect (Scope 2) GHG emissions
The reporting organization shall report the following information:

a. Gross location-based energy indirect (Scope 2) GHG emissions in metric tons of CO2 equivalent.

b. If applicable, gross market-based energy indirect (Scope 2) GHG emissions in metric tons of CO2 equivalent.

c. If available, the gases included in the calculation; whether CO2, CH4, N2O, HFCs, PFCs, SF6, NF3, or all.

d. Base year for the calculation, if applicable, including:
i. the rationale for choosing it;
ii. emissions in the base year;
iii. the context for any significant changes in emissions that triggered recalculations of base year emissions.

e. Source of the emission factors and the global warming potential (GWP) rates used, or a reference to the GWP source.

f. Consolidation approach for emissions; whether equity share, financial control, or operational control.

g. Standards, methodologies, assumptions, and/or calculation tools used.

see previous section and page 21 CSR Report 2021.

Our overall consumption of energy in 2021 increased compared with 2020, due to fewer Covid-19 related constraints for our operations. Our only primary energy source was gas. A total of 4 586 MWh (2020: 3 931 MWh) was used, plus another 3 615 MWh (2020: 2 336 MWh) from district heating systems. A total of 16 481 MWh of electricity was consumed (2020: 15 632 MWh). The primary energy emissions amount to 874 t CO2 e (1 009 t CO2 e in 2020). District-heating-related emissions increased to 570 t CO2 e (411 t CO2 e in 2020). The data for district heating consumption is constant subject to fluctuations because ancillary costs are reported with a delay from landlords for the past two years. Additional Scope 2 emissions from electricity consumption amount to 1 436 t CO2 e (previous year: 1 146 t CO2 e). Location-based emissions would have been 3 564 t CO2 e (2020: 3 647 t CO2 e). The systematic purchase of green electricity products and Energy Attribute Certificates in Europe, the US and Canada is having a significant impact and can compensate partly for the increase in electricity consumption. Our “Guiding document for renewable energy purchase” manifests our strategy and targets and is a helpful tool to streamline renewable energy purchases within the group.

Key Performance Indicator GRI SRS-305-3: Other indirect (Scope 3) GHG emissions
The reporting organization shall report the following information:

a. Gross other indirect (Scope 3) GHG emissions in metric tons of CO2 equivalent.

b. If available, the gases included in the calculation; whether CO2, CH4, N2O, HFCs, PFCs, SF6, NF3, or all.

c. Biogenic CO2 emissions in metric tons of CO2 equivalent.

d. Other indirect (Scope 3) GHG emissions categories and activities included in the calculation.

e. Base year for the calculation, if applicable, including:
i. the rationale for choosing it;
ii. emissions in the base year;
iii. the context for any significant changes in emissions that triggered recalculations of base year emissions.

f. Source of the emission factors and the global warming potential (GWP) rates used, or a reference to the GWP source.

g. Standards, methodologies, assumptions, and/or calculation tools used.

see previous section and page 14-15, 21 CSR Report 2021

Key Performance Indicator GRI SRS-305-5: Reduction of GHG emissions
The reporting organization shall report the following information:

a. GHG emissions reduced as a direct result of reduction initiatives, in metric tons of CO2 equivalent.

b. Gases included in the calculation; whether CO2, CH4, N2O, HFCs, PFCs, SF6, NF3, or all.

c. Base year or baseline, including the rationale for choosing it.

d. Scopes in which reductions took place; whether direct (Scope 1), energy indirect (Scope 2), and/or other indirect (Scope 3).

e. Standards, methodologies, assumptions, and/or calculation tools used.

New baseline year for emission calculation is 2019 as our GHG reporting year is synchronized with our 5-year business strategy. The new business strategy is compiled in our Fenix Way, published 2019.