14. Employment Rights

The company reports on how it complies with nationally and internationally recognised standards relating to employee rights as well as on how it fosters staff involvement in the company and in sustainability management, what goals it has set itself in this regard, what results it has achieved thus far and where it sees risks.

In the apparel business, we have a global supply chain, mainly in Europe and Asia. Most of our staff members operate under German, Swedish, Dutch, US and Finnish laws and the companies in our Group comply with national laws.

We align our activities with the ten principles of the United Nations Global Compact. The principles provide guidance when coping with human rights challenges, labor-related matters and global environmental and compliance issues. We value ethical manufacturing practices and are committed to ensuring that our business partners share these values. As part of our membership in the Fair Labor association high risk areas were defined and are addressed ever since.

At the heart of this commitment stands a Code of Conduct, which has to be signed by our employees and our suppliers worldwide. These Codes of Conduct were established by each individual brand and were handed to the suppliers for agreement to assure that our values are implemented in our supply chains. The 2018 subscription rate to our Code of Conduct for Supplierswas stable with 95%. 

We ensure that everyone can raise issues of concern (compliance hotline) or suggest improvements through regular staff meetings; our suppliers use suggestions boxes or staff competitions to achieve the same goals. 

Regularly, we educate and inform staff around the globe on the state of our sustainability efforts and encourage local initiatives promoting sustainability (e.g., use of recycled paper, LED lighting, organic food/coffee etc.). All stakeholders are involved in the development of our sustainability journey (including customers and staff members). 

We have set the goals to e.g. guarantee a safe workplace, provide education and ensure zero incidents of child or forced labor. All goals including KPI's are defined in the Fenix Way (pp.44-45) and are monitored by the group's CSO in cooperation with the responsible CEO.

We conduct permanent monitoring of the frameworks at our locations. Material risks include political changes or economic crisis.

For more detailed information see CSR Report 2018, pp. 6, 27-33.

15. Equal Opportunities

The company discloses in what way it has implemented national and international processes and what goals it has for the promotion of equal opportunities and diversity, occupational health and safety, participation rights, the integration of migrants and people with disabilities, fair pay as well as a work-life balance and how it will achieve these.

We see employee diversity as a guiding principle in our employment policy. This means promoting the diversity and heterogeneity of the individuals in the company in order to attain the highest possible productivity, creativity and efficiency.

In our German operation about four per cent of our staff have disabilities or come from sheltered workshops which we utilize for certain services.Fenix Outdoor had about 37 appren-tices and trainees (31 in 2017) and about 30 interns last year (40 in 2017). Our policy is to promote equal opportunities for men and women and the Board expressively demands an equal yet often enough more female promoting approach when it comes to recruitments into managerial positions. The proportion of female middle managers currently employed is 34 per cent (2017: 36 per cent), while the proportion of women in top-management positions is 20 per cent (2017: 15 per cent). Our board is 17 per cent female (all data include the newly-acquired entities and our China operations).

Every year, Fenix offers its employees the chance to experience the outdoors and learn something about nature survival skills as well as the handling and functioning of our equipment. In some instances, participation in these events is part of the development curriculum or even mandatory. But most of our employees are active outdoor enthusiasts. In order to allow them to participate in outdoor activities and achieve a good work-life-balance, individual arrangements are made between supervisors and their staff members.

The staff turnover rate in 2018 over all operations including the retail business was 20 % (2017: 15 %). The ratio between females and males leaving Fenix Outdoor was nearly equal (ratio M/F 1,08:1), meaning that roughly 51,9 % of staff members leaving were men (2017: 53,5 %). All eligible staff members are entitled to parental leave (e.g., parents with children under a certain age level; the definition differs from country to country).  

Our wages paid for a normal work week are competitive and meet legal and industrial standards at least.

For more detailed information see CSR Report 2018, pp. 34-35.

16. Qualifications

The company discloses what goals it has set and what measures it has taken to promote the employability of all employees, i.e. the ability of all employees to participate in the working and professional world, and in view of adapting to demographic change, and where risks are seen.

We want well educated and trained employees, who are fit for the challenges of the 21st century while at the sametime remain loyal to our company. Fenix Outdoor provided each employee with an average of 90 hours in personal and technical training (2017: 67 hours per staff member), including training on corporate social responsibility and compli-ance (n= 2 492).

Fenix Outdoor continued its Trainee Program for young profes-sionals in 2018. The program started in 2011 with three management train-ees, and in 2018 we again hired three trainees. We also support employees who want to develop their education, such as achieving MBAs. Through these measures our goals have been successfully supported over the past years and we will continue investing into these development opportunities.

Key Performance Indicators to criteria 14 to 16

Key Performance Indicator GRI SRS-403-9: Work-related injuries
The reporting organization shall report the following information:

a. For all employees:
i. The number and rate of fatalities as a result of work-related injury;
ii. The number and rate of high-consequence work-related injuries (excluding fatalities);
iii. The number and rate of recordable work-related injuries;
iv. The main types of work-related injury;
v. The number of hours worked.

b. For all workers who are not employees but whose work and/or workplace is controlled by the organization:
i. The number and rate of fatalities as a result of work-related injury;
ii. The number and rate of high-consequence work-related injuries (excluding fatalities);
iii. The number and rate of recordable work-related injuries;
iv. The main types of work-related injury;
v. The number of hours worked.

You will find the remaining numbers c-g of the indicator SRS 403-9 in the GRI standard and may additionally report them here.


Key Performance Indicator GRI SRS-403-10: Work-related ill health
The reporting organization shall report the following information:

a. For all employees:
i. The number of fatalities as a result of work-related ill health;
ii. The number of cases of recordable work-related ill health;
iii. The main types of work-related ill health.
b. For all workers who are not employees but whose work and/or workplace is controlled by the organization:
i. The number of fatalities as a result of work-related ill health;
ii. The number of cases of recordable work-related ill health;
iii. The main types of work-related ill health.

You will find the remaining numbers c-e of the indicator SRS 403-10 in the GRI standard and may additionally report them here.

Based on the reports received (re-tail and production) a total of 24 days (compared with 1 142 days in 2017) were lost due to absenteeism. There were 47 work-related injuries recorded(2017: 132). No fatalities or work-related diseases were reported (CSR Report 2018, p.35)

Key Performance Indicator GRI SRS-403-4: Worker participation on occupational health and safety
The reporting organization shall report the following information for employees and for workers who are not employees but whose work and/or workplace is controlled by the organization:

a. A description of the processes for worker participation and consultation in the development, implementation, and evaluation of the occupational health and safety management system, and for providing access to and communicating relevant information on occupational health and safety to workers.

b. Where formal joint management–worker health and safety committees exist, a description of their responsibilities, meeting frequency, decision-making authority, and whether and, if so, why any workers are not represented by these committees.

According to respective law and after risk assessment.

Key Performance Indicator GRI SRS-404-1: Average hours of training
The reporting organization shall report the following information:

a. Average hours of training that the organization’s employees have undertaken during the reporting period, by:
i. gender;
ii. employee category.

See table in CSR Report 2018, p.38

Key Performance Indicator GRI SRS-405-1: Diversity
The reporting organization shall report the following information:

a. Percentage of individuals within the organization’s governance bodies in each of the following diversity categories:
i. Gender;
ii. Age group: under 30 years old, 30-50 years old, over 50 years old;
iii. Other indicators of diversity where relevant (such as minority or vulnerable groups).

b. Percentage of employees per employee category in each of the following diversity categories:
i. Gender;
ii. Age group: under 30 years old, 30-50 years old, over 50 years old;
iii. Other indicators of diversity where relevant (such as minority or vulnerable groups).

See table in CSR Report 2018, pp.37-38

Key Performance Indicator GRI SRS-406-1: Incidents of discrimination
The reporting organization shall report the following information:

a. Total number of incidents of discrimination during the reporting period.

b. Status of the incidents and actions taken with reference to the following:
i. Incident reviewed by the organization;
ii. Remediation plans being implemented;
iii. Remediation plans that have been implemented, with results reviewed through routine internal management review processes;
iv. Incident no longer subject to action.

None, see CSR Report 2018, p.42

17. Human Rights

The company discloses what measures it takes, strategies it pursues and targets it sets for itself and for the supply chain for ensuring that human rights are respected globally and that forced and child labour as well as all forms of exploitation are prevented. Information should also be provided on the results of the measures and on any relevant risks.

We aim at managing our societal impacts in a holistic manner. The Fenix Way Management Compass® is the appropriate tool for all managerial levels in order to also address those dimensions which tend to fall behind when economic challenges arise. Within the Fenix Way we have set the target to conduct regular human rights related activities until 2020.

As part of our membership in the Fair Labor association high risk areas were defined and are addressed ever since. The material risks are political shifts which may lead to violations of human rights. We cooperate with NGO's to ensure further adherence of human rights and conduct a human rights assessment. A compliance hotline is available for all employees to report incidents. We have identified violations within our supply chain and reacted, amongst others, with our Supplier Code of Conduct.

We are building and developing strong relationships with our business partners: suppliers, retailers and service providers alike. But we also engage with our customers and civil society groups. Our Supplier Code of Conduct has been developed in line with the Fair Labor Association's standards. As in previous years, we audited our supply chain partners according to the Fenix Outdoor/FLA standards. We also engaged in a closer partnership with Elevate and streamlined our auditing protocols, as well as held joint training sessions on the FLA principles, responsible purchasing and root cause analysis, along with hands-on practical tips when being in a factory during our visits. We were successfully accredited in an unanimous vote of the FLA Board in early 2018. As a consequence of the growth of the internal auditing team in Leadertek, we educated new colleagues in Vietnam so they can support our core team in conducting field audits. The 2018 subscription rate to our Code of Conduct for Suppliers was stable at 95%.

See CSR Report 2018, p. 27.

Key Performance Indicators to criteria 17

Key Performance Indicator GRI SRS-412-3: Investment agreements subject to human rights screenings
The reporting organization shall report the following information:

a. Total number and percentage of significant investment agreements and contracts that include human rights clauses or that underwent human rights screening.

b. The definition used for ‘significant investment agreements’.

No such agreements.

Key Performance Indicator GRI SRS-412-1: Operations subject to human rights reviews
The reporting organization shall report the following information:

a. Total number and percentage of operations that have been subject to human rights reviews or human rights impact assessments, by country.

100 % of our business locations are monitored on a regular basis (89 factories in China & Vietnam are special subject to human right reviews).

Key Performance Indicator GRI SRS-414-1: New suppliers subject to social screening
The reporting organization shall report the following information:

a. Percentage of new suppliers that were screened using social criteria.

100%

Key Performance Indicator GRI SRS-414-2: Social impacts in the supply chain
The reporting organization shall report the following information:

a. Number of suppliers assessed for social impacts.

b. Number of suppliers identified as having significant actual and potential negative social impacts.

c. Significant actual and potential negative social impacts identified in the supply chain.

d. Percentage of suppliers identified as having significant actual and potential negative social impacts with which improvements were agreed upon as a result of assessment.

e. Percentage of suppliers identified as having significant actual and potential negative social impacts with which relationships were terminated as a result of assessment, and why.

CSR Report 2018, p. 42

18. Corporate Citizenship

The company discloses how it contributes to corporate citizenship in the regions in which it conducts its core business activities.

Several citizenship projects were conducted in 2018. We believe that those projects are of course of value to the local communities but all too often they are overemphasized as "the" CSR activity of a corporation. We think this does not do justice to the real societal challenges and, hence, do not holistically report on those activities.

Giving back to society is good cor-porate citizenship. Every year, Naturkompaniet’s and Partioaitta’s loyalty club members donate one per cent of their members’ bonuses to an outdoor or nature project. The members vote for the projects at the end of each year. In 2018, more than 300 000 euros were distributed among several projects. Some brands donate a specific sum per sold item to a cause, for nature conservation or support for children in need, with around 250 000 euros collected. In total, around 633 400 euros were donated to environmental and social causes. Every winter, we donate sleeping bags and jackets to homeless people. In some retail stores we offer coffee for a voluntary contribution and the money raised is sent to an environmental foundation.

The concept will be further developed until 2019.

The CSO monitors the progress in cooperation with the responsible CEO.

A risk analysis was conducted for selected products such as cooker. No social risks were defined.

Key Performance Indicators to criteria 18

Key Performance Indicator GRI SRS-201-1: Direct economic value generated and distributed
The reporting organization shall report the following information:

a. Direct economic value generated and distributed (EVG&D) on an accruals basis, including the basic components for the organization’s global operations as listed below. If data are presented on a cash basis, report the justification for this decision in addition to reporting the following basic components:
i. Direct economic value generated: revenues;
ii. Economic value distributed: operating costs, employee wages and benefits, payments to providers of capital, payments to government by country, and community investments;
iii. Economic value retained: ‘direct economic value generated’ less ‘economic value distributed’.

b. Where significant, report EVG&D separately at country, regional, or market levels, and the criteria used for defining significance.

See CSR Report 2018, p. 24, 25

19. Political Influence

All significant input relating to legislative procedures, all entries in lobby lists, all significant payments of membership fees, all contributions to governments as well as all donations to political parties and politicians should be disclosed by country in a differentiated way.

We do not engage with any political groups, be they political parties, governments or legislators.

Nonetheless, where possible, we engage on a voluntary basis in initiatives that aim at enhancing the sustainability of the industry or given societies we are operating in (voluntary commitments). 
As a member of the EOG, national trade associations (where relevant),  and various chambers of commerce we are also part of groups that raise the voice of the industry on various topics. However, we refrain from political debates in these organizations to the utmost extend. 

For Fenix Outdoor as a group of globally active entities in the fields of retail, apparel, outdoor cooking and navigational gear, several national and regional legislations apply. Hence, we are constantly monitoring and up-dating our procedures in order to achieve compliance in all legislations we are operating in.

The material risk occurs within the business-to-business sector, such as corruption incidents including bribery or anti-trust violations.

We require compliance with our Code of Conduct and try to ensure that our staff and business partners share the same understanding of compliant behavior and business dealings. We introduced a compliance management system in 2012, which is continuously improved.

Key Performance Indicators to criteria 19

Key Performance Indicator GRI SRS-415-1: Political contributions
The reporting organization shall report the following information:

a. Total monetary value of financial and in-kind political contributions made directly and indirectly by the organization by country and recipient/beneficiary.

b. If applicable, how the monetary value of in-kind contributions was estimated.

0€

20. Conduct that Complies with the Law and Policy

The company discloses which measures, standards, systems and processes are in place to prevent unlawful conduct and, in particular, corruption, how they are verified, which results have been achieved to date and where it sees there to be risks. The company depicts how corruption and other contraventions in the company are prevented and exposed and what sanctions are imposed.

The adherence to laws and regulations is important in conducting our business. We not only require compliance with our Code of Conduct but rather we want to build on experience and ensure that our staff and business partners share the same understanding of compliant behavior and business
dealings.

We introduced a compliance management system in 2012, which is continuously improved. The Fenix Outdoor CMS concept complies with the standard IDW PS 980 and ISO 19600. As with our sustainability report, the CSO submits an annual compliance report to the CEO and the board. Risks in compliance related terms arise from our global supply chain and from business udertakings in risk countires. However, the CSO and the CEO together have drawn-up a list of no-go countries and frequently monitor corruption and political risks developments. Following the Compliance Guideline, the Chief Compliance Officer (CCO) submitted his annual report to the board in April 2018. As part of the compliance system, all managers are obliged to sign and declare on an annual basis that they are following the compliance rules and that staff members are aware of the system. We held two Compliance Committee meetings at Globetrotter level.We had no cases of corruption and achieved compliance and dialogues about our compliance rules throughout the company during various trainings and refresher trainings.New restrictions in offering/receiving invitations and gifts have been imposed. For more information, see compliance table on page 10 in CSR Report 2018. Our compliance system is working and all our goals (see Fenix Way) have been achieved thusfar.

Key Performance Indicators to criteria 20

Key Performance Indicator GRI SRS-205-1: Operations assesed for risks related to corruption
The reporting organization shall report the following information:

a. Total number and percentage of operations assessed for risks related to corruption.

b. Significant risks related to corruption identified through the risk assessment.

100%

Key Performance Indicator GRI SRS-205-3: Incidents of corruption
Die berichtende Organisation muss über folgende Informationen berichten:

a. Total number and nature of confirmed incidents of corruption.

b. Total number of confirmed incidents in which employees were dismissed or disciplined for corruption.

c. Total number of confirmed incidents when contracts with business partners were terminated or not renewed due to violations related to corruption.

d. Public legal cases regarding corruption brought against the organization or its employees during the reporting period and the outcomes of such cases.

0

Key Performance Indicator GRI SRS-419-1: Non-compliance with laws and regulations
The reporting organization shall report the following information:

a. Significant fines and non-monetary sanctions for non-compliance with laws and/or regulations in the social and economic area in terms of:
i. total monetary value of significant fines;
ii. total number of non-monetary sanctions;
iii. cases brought through dispute resolution mechanisms.

b. If the organization has not identified any non-compliance with laws and/or regulations, a brief statement of this fact is sufficient.

c. The context against which significant fines and non-monetary sanctions were incurred.

None