14. Employment Rights

The company reports on how it complies with nationally and internationally recognised standards relating to employee rights as well as on how it fosters staff involvement in the company and in sustainability management, what goals it has set itself in this regard, what results it has achieved thus far and where it sees risks.

Compliance with all valid statutory provisions in the interests of employees is a given. Compliance with these and all other external and internal provisions is ensured through constant controls by the internal Compliance department.   

In addition to the valid legal provisions, the company has dedicated itself, through a range of internal agreements and regulations, to a high social standard and excellent working conditions, in order to retain employees, counteract future fluctuations and attract a high standard of new applicants. These measures include, for example, the comprehensive health management program and an above-average prioritization of health-promoting processes, as well as the appreciation we show to our long-standing employees.   
 
The creation of a long-term relationship between the dedicated and high-performing employees and their employer is part of the human resources policy:  

Human resources strategy   
 
For an employer in the public sector, the close participation of the employees in all relevant corporate decisions is part of the culture. Currently, the employees are represented by 31 members of the Works Council, by the Council for Employees with Disabilities, the Executives’ Committee, and the Supervisory Board. A large proportion of the workforce is unionized.  


Inclusion with the material topics & sustainable ideas
The employees are included as stakeholders in the materiality analysis. Furthermore, all employees can submit their improvement suggestions via the internal idea management system, InnovationPilot, in order to actively contribute to the corporate targets.  


Contribution to the Sustainable Development Goals
In 2015, the United Nations adopted 17 Sustainable Development Goals (SDGs). Politicians and businesses around the world have been called upon to transfer these SDGs into their fields of action and make a key contribution to achieving them by the year 2030 through, for example, innovation, pioneering technology, and responsible supply chains. The airport wants to demonstrate the impact its business activities has on the SDGs and how it can contribute positively in the future to achieving the Sustainable Development Goals through its strategic projects. To this end, FMG first identified the goals that are relevant to it and that it can influence. In 2017, another goal was added to the eleven identified: With SDG 11 «Sustainable cities and communities», sustainability is also taken into account in the realization of strategic building projects on the airport campus.


Dealing with risk
The traditionally strong participation of employees means that their interests have long been at the heart of corporate decisions. Thanks to the economically strong and prominent position of the employer in the region, no negative changes are feared here.

15. Equal Opportunities

The company discloses in what way it has implemented national and international processes and what goals it has for the promotion of equal opportunities and diversity, occupational health and safety, participation rights, the integration of migrants and people with disabilities, fair pay as well as a work-life balance and how it will achieve these.

Diversity: both personal and cultural
As a company with an international outlook, Munich Airport benefits from the diversity of its employees. It respects the cultural heritage of all of its employees, taking into account their diverse interests and needs. Some 24 percent of Group employees come from more than 100 different countries. Most non-German employees come from Turkey, followed by Croatia and Hungary. Because acceptance and mutual respect play an important role in this, all managers and employees are aware of and observe the German General Equal Treatment Act (AGG). 
 
As an employer, FMG’s Human Resources corporate division accepts responsibility for its employees, ensures equal opportunities, and offers prospects at all levels. 
 
When filling open positions, FMG primarily follows the principle of suitability (pursuant to § 1 AGG). Equality is an expression of the core of its brand «Living ideas – Connecting lives» and helps to implement the brand values of the company. In its efforts to gradually increase the share of women, the Munich Airport Group formulated individual targets per management level instead of a fixed quota. FMG possesses a great deal of expertise in the deployment and development of employees with impaired health.   
 
In order to achieve its goals, FMG is publicly positioning itself on this topic, actively supporting an increase in the proportion of women in management positions, for example by optimizing re-entry opportunities, making managers’ employment conditions more flexible, and promoting qualified female employees by creating development measures. Munich Airport Group has set itself the target of successively increasing the proportion of women in these roles. In autumn 2017, individual target figures were agreed to this end, and as a follow-up deadline, a three-year period up to June 30, 2020 was defined. Women receive support at the start of their management activity, for example, via the «cross-mentoring program», in which each participant is assigned a manager from another company as a mentor for a period of one year. The aim of the «MStars» network for female FMG managers is to promote continuous exchange between professionally successful women within and outside the company. In 2018, it was possible to expand the network further, and intensify the cooperation with other companies. Initial events also took place that were specifically aimed at a female audience, which Munich Airport initiated or supported.   
 
FMG has a representative in the Health and Social Management department of the Human Resources division, who is responsible for representing employees in matters that affect severely disabled people, and who serves as a contact person for severely disabled employees (see: SGB IX, Rehabilitation and Participation of Disabled People). In addition, FMG also participates in inclusion projects, such as its cooperation with the Freisinger Fröbelschule BiG [Education Center on Gartenstrasse], an institution of the Freisinger Lebenshilfe e.V. 
 
FMG provides a range of offerings to ensure equal opportunities within the company: occupational integration management, the continued employment of employees whose abilities have changed, the recruitment of people with severe disabilities, and the training of young adults whose intellectual development must be supported. 
 
Where appropriate, individual performance-based compensation targets are defined with level 2 managers.



Wage differences by gender
Since there are pay scale agreements within almost all companies across the Munich Airport Group, there are no pay differences between men and women involved in comparable activities.  


Business locations and suppliers where a potential threat to the right to freedom of association or collective bargaining could exist
There were no instances of restriction of the right to freedom of association or collective bargaining in the reporting period.


Personnel expenses and payments above the general pay scale
Flughafen München GmbH is a member of the regional public employers’ association of Bavaria and, as such, is bound by the TVöD collective pay scale agreement for public sector employees. FMG employees participate in a company retirement scheme, which is governed by the pay scale agreement and covered by the Bavarian supplementary pension fund for municipal employers. Following negotiations with the labor unions ver.di and dbb, the remuneration for employees of FMG and AeroGround was increased as at March 1, 2018; in the first step this increase was on average 3.19 percent. Lower-paid wage groups tended to profit more from this collective agreement. In addition, two further wage increases were agreed: For April 2019, an average increase of 3.09 percent was agreed and from March 2020, employees will receive on average 1.06 percent more in their pay packets.


16. Qualifications

The company discloses what goals it has set and what measures it has taken to promote the employability of all employees, i.e. the ability of all employees to participate in the working and professional world, and in view of adapting to demographic change, and where risks are seen.

The long-term human resources concept is geared toward the wider corporate strategy, the current business situation, and broader trends within society such as demographic change, digitalization, individualization, mobility, health, and education. The human resources strategy sets out important objectives (see criterion 14) for HR management, which are reviewed annually and adjusted as required.   
 

Generation change as a major challenge
Currently, the greatest HR challenge facing the company is demographic change. In order to meet the higher personnel requirements caused by the large waves of age-determined retirements expected over the coming years, it is absolutely essential that the airport’s employer attractiveness be boosted in the competitive labor market of the region. Munich Airport is therefore committed to responding to the values of younger generations and the expectations they have for their everyday professional lives. As an employer, the airport wants to actively shape this cultural change and, at the same time, guarantee the knowledge transfer between experienced and new employees. This is a matter of cleverly dovetailing the consequences of the generational change, on the one hand, and the changes in the workplace caused by digitalization and process optimization on the other. In this way, it will be possible to work efficiently, while deploying personnel in a manner appropriate to the requirements, and to offer attractive employment conditions for all generations of the airport family.    


Commitment to the next generation
The Munich Airport Group is one of the largest training organizations in the region. School leavers have the choice of 20 different apprenticeships and dual fields of study. Flughafen München GmbH received 1,635 applications for the apprenticeships starting in 2018. On September 1, 2018, 97 apprentices embarked upon their professional career at Munich Airport. This meant there were 277 young people taking part in apprenticeships Group-wide as of the reporting date of December 31. At the same time, 46 young people completed their apprenticeships at FMG. A further 84 school-age children and 123 university interns received an insight into the world of airports, producing 17 project-related Bachelor’s and Master’s dissertations in the process. In a twelve-month graduate training program, university graduates received an effective preparation for professional life at the airport. This includes both specialist knowledge and an understanding of the complex overall system that is the airport. A mentoring program helps trainees to establish their own company-wide network.


Focusing on family and health
Group management is convinced that good performance and a family-friendly working environment are mutually dependent. FMG has for many years placed a high priority on being family friendly and has supported this with numerous offerings. Moreover, much of the airport’s work in this area aims to maintain or improve staff ability to work. The Corporate Health and Social Management (BGM) division offers a wide array of services, ranging from occupational medicine and employee catering to advice for people living in difficult circumstances. The Munich Airport Group offers a range of supplementary company benefits for a healthy work/life balance. For example, more than 700 employees utilize the offer to work up to 30 percent of their individual working hours from their home or mobile office.  


Catering in the employee canteens
900,000 meals are served annually in the five employee canteens on the airport campus. The goal of the canteen concept is to offer employees well-balanced meal options in a pleasant environment. In 2018, the canteen in Terminal 2 was completely renovated and re-opened with the theme «Mediterranean meets Art».


Support for longer-term illness phases
As at January 1, 2019 a new works agreement for occupational integration management (BEM) came into effect. It regulates the processes around the voluntary procedure for employees, who were off sick for more than six weeks within a period of a year and then return to their workplace. The program counteracts future incapacity to work and contributes to maintaining employability.


Musculoskeletal program «Aufwind»
30 percent of all illness-related days of absence in FMG between 2013 and 2017 are attributable to problems with the musculoskeletal system. For this reason, Corporate Health and Social Management implemented a holistic prevention program, aimed at reducing chronic musculoskeletal disorders, maintaining the ability to work, and thus improving productivity. As part of this program, the FMG occupational medicine service also works closely with external physiotherapists.


Occupational protection
FMG has set itself the goal of continuously improving working conditions, and of lowering the accident and illness figures. New solutions are constantly being developed at Munich Airport to counteract health hazards and risks in the workplace. The first Group-wide workplace safety committee meeting, held in 2018, provided the opportunity to exchange ideas, information, and opinions on cross-Group topics such as safety standards, accident prevention strategies and health care. Around 70 managers, works council members, specialists in occupational health and safety, and safety officers from the subsidiaries took part in the event.  


Occupational safety conference at Munich Airport
A high safety level in the ground handling service is only guaranteed through close, cross-department cooperation in the area of occupational health and safety. Some 30 specialists from the field of occupational health and safety along with safety officers from the subsidiaries, managers, work council members, and chief executive officers of external ground handling operators met in 2018 at an occupational health and safety conference held at the Airport Academy to discuss the role of managers in relation to occupational health and safety and the possibilities for improving communication between and with employees on the apron. The aim was to identify fields of action and to derive measures together, in order to minimize hazards and avoid accidents. An occupational safety conference was set to take place again in 2019.


«Common task, common responsibility» annual report
2017 saw the first publication of a joint annual report of the occupational health and safety, in-house health management and company medical service divisions.    


Ergonomics
One of the core tasks of the Occupational Health and Safety division is the design of ergonomic workstations. In particular, aircraft ground services staff perform challenging physical activities with a verifiably heightened risk of musculoskeletal disorders. In 2018, FMG invested in a study conducted in cooperation with the Fraunhofer Institute into developing an automatic, robot-controlled baggage loading system. The aim is to significantly reduce the manual activities of employees in aircraft ground handling. Further concrete project steps are planned for 2019.


Outlook
The Occupational Health and Safety division works closely with the Airport Academy – for example, on the development of web-based training for occupational health and safety-related topics. In 2018, the review of FMG’s in-house occupational health and safety management system by the Trade Supervisory Office was of paramount importance; certification was planned for 2019.


Numerous prospects for employees with impaired health
FMG possesses a great deal of expertise in the employment of people with impaired health. In order to facilitate as normal an everyday working life as possible, a range of offers is provided: occupational integration management, the continued employment of employees whose abilities have changed, the recruitment of people with severe disabilities, and the training of young adults whose intellectual development must be supported. As at Monday, December 31, 2018, the Group employed 698 staff members with disabilities or equivalent limitations, corresponding to around seven percent of the total workforce.


Back health – lifting aids in the baggage transportation system
Lifting aids have been installed on all work stations on the baggage transportation system in Terminal 1. Working with the relevant divisions, various loading tools were tested and assessed beforehand. The aim of the lifting aids is to help prevent chronic musculoskeletal disorders. Furthermore, they help employees with impaired health to return to work.  


Living space for employees
The demand for living space in the airport region is growing constantly. At the same time, Munich Airport must – within the framework of its social responsibility – ensure the future personnel requirements, which also includes strategies to support employees in finding accommodation. Depending on demand, the airport offers its staff separate 1- and 2-person apartments, rooms in shared accommodation, and apartments in apartment blocks. Capacity for a total of 500 employees will be available by fall 2019, with additional to follow.


Airport Academy: Experts in education and training
Munich Airport operates a certified, in-house training center with just under 50 employees. On more than 38,000 participant days, 26,700 Group employees and external customers attended seminars there, focused particularly on the areas of human resources, management, aviation, and security. Digital training formats via a learning management platform are a fixed component of the offering, including, for example, the cross-Group safety management training as part of the EASA certification of the airport. The Airport Academy, moreover, offers training for an international audience, as an accredited training institute of the Airports Council International (ACI) – in cooperation with the international umbrella association of passenger airports. For example, more than 100 external cyber security specialists completed training in four different seminar types at the Information Security Hub, which opened on the airport campus in early 2018.   
 
The HR Development and Executive Support department, in its advising and conceptual role, supports the strategy as well as short-term and medium-term orientation of the company. In this process, Human Resources uses various instruments to select and develop employees and management staff. 
 
To ensure quality, the HR Development and Executive Support department also performs a governance role.  


Examples of further training measures are:   
 
The AMPAP development program
The AMPAP program (Airport Management Professional Airport Accreditation Program) is a concurrent further education program from ACI/ICAO for the purposes of expanding airport management skills.   
 
Graduate training program
HR Development offers trainee positions to ensure the acquisition of new, junior staff. On the one hand, junior staff are to acquire specialized knowledge in the field. On the other hand, they are to understand the complex overall system of the airport, know important interfaces, and be able to contribute to projects and overarching topics in a competent manner.   
 
Qualification dialog
Every employee can discuss their training ideas and wishes in a qualification dialog with their direct manager. Management examines these suggestions and gives the employee binding feedback by the annual employee appraisal at the latest.   
 
Exchange program
Trainees, employees, and managers have the opportunity to expand their professional and social skills in national or international exchange programs, in addition to individual training opportunities. With the Airport Academy, Munich Airport operates a certified, Group-owned training unit that handles operational personnel topics like training, coaching, and team development.

Key Performance Indicators to criteria 14 to 16

Key Performance Indicator GRI SRS-403-9: Work-related injuries
The reporting organization shall report the following information:

a. For all employees:
i. The number and rate of fatalities as a result of work-related injury;
ii. The number and rate of high-consequence work-related injuries (excluding fatalities);
iii. The number and rate of recordable work-related injuries;
iv. The main types of work-related injury;
v. The number of hours worked.

b. For all workers who are not employees but whose work and/or workplace is controlled by the organization:
i. The number and rate of fatalities as a result of work-related injury;
ii. The number and rate of high-consequence work-related injuries (excluding fatalities);
iii. The number and rate of recordable work-related injuries;
iv. The main types of work-related injury;
v. The number of hours worked.

You will find the remaining numbers c-g of the indicator SRS 403-9 in the GRI standard and may additionally report them here.


Key Performance Indicator GRI SRS-403-10: Work-related ill health
The reporting organization shall report the following information:

a. For all employees:
i. The number of fatalities as a result of work-related ill health;
ii. The number of cases of recordable work-related ill health;
iii. The main types of work-related ill health.
b. For all workers who are not employees but whose work and/or workplace is controlled by the organization:
i. The number of fatalities as a result of work-related ill health;
ii. The number of cases of recordable work-related ill health;
iii. The main types of work-related ill health.

You will find the remaining numbers c-e of the indicator SRS 403-10 in the GRI standard and may additionally report them here.

Occupational health and safety   
Group 1) 2018
Accident statistics 2)  
Reportable occupational accidents 231
Resulting days of absence3) 5,820
Fatal occupational accidents 0
Rate per 1,000 workers4) 26.55
1)Including apprentices, workers in minor employment, temporary workers, and interns. 
 

2)Injuries requiring first aid are also recorded whenever employees attend Munich Airport’s medical center. 
 
 
3)These are calendar days and are counted from the day following the work accident. 
 

4)Reportable occupational accidents * 1,000 / annual average actual employee capacity (EC)
 

Aircraft handling on the ground is a critical area for occupational health and safety measures at Munich Airport. This is why FMG publishes additional accident statistics for employees who work in aircraft handling.  

Occupational illnesses1)    
  2018 2018
In % Group 2) FMG
Reported occupational illnesses 4 4
1)Including apprentices, excluding workers in minor employment, temporary workers, and interns 
 
 
2)2018 without HSD.


Sick leave1)      
Group 2) 2018
In % Women Men Total
Illness rate2) 7.48 8.74 7,983)
       
FMG 2017
In % Women Men Total
Illness rate2) 5.1 8.9 7.3
 1)Including apprentices, excluding workers in minor employment, temporary workers, and interns 
 
 
2)Hours off sick in relation to planned working hours, including rehabilitation, therapy programs, treatment, and so on. Relates to the total number of employees as per 1). 
 

3)Excluding InfoGate, LabCampus, MAI and MUCreal  

Key Performance Indicator GRI SRS-403-4: Worker participation on occupational health and safety
The reporting organization shall report the following information for employees and for workers who are not employees but whose work and/or workplace is controlled by the organization:

a. A description of the processes for worker participation and consultation in the development, implementation, and evaluation of the occupational health and safety management system, and for providing access to and communicating relevant information on occupational health and safety to workers.

b. Where formal joint management–worker health and safety committees exist, a description of their responsibilities, meeting frequency, decision-making authority, and whether and, if so, why any workers are not represented by these committees.

The Occupational Health & Safety, Occupational Medicine (MediCare), and Corporate Health and Social Management divisions are primarily responsible for occupational health and safety within the Group. They work closely with the employer and the works council. This cooperation forms a solid foundation for the sustainable and systematic development of preventative measures that benefit the health and safety of employees in their daily work. The occupational safety management system ensures that strategic projects are integrated into everyday life, and develops innovative solutions and prevention approaches for this.  
 
The occupational safety management system also ensures that operations run smoothly while setting up and tracking processes, and establishes transparency and clarity with respect to legal and operational requirements as well as to behavior that promotes occupational safety.  
 
The occupational safety policy was developed as part of the occupational safety management system that was implemented at FMG and AE in 2015. The approaches and objectives in the area of occupational health and safety apply to FMG and all subsidiaries (excluding MediCare and AeroGround Berlin). The executive management and managers operate a forward-looking preventive occupational health and safety system and introduce the measures necessary to prevent work-related accidents, injuries, and illnesses. The Occupational Health and Safety subunit provides Group-wide support to ensure that the H&S policy is implemented and followed.


MediCare
The MediCare Flughafen München Medizinisches Zentrum GmbH provides a broad range of medical services with a highly specialized team of doctors and nurses. This includes providing emergency care to passengers, visitors, and employees as well as occupational health and flight physician services. The Munich Airport Clinic GmbH, a private clinic with 9 beds, was opened in June 2018, in addition to the AirportClinic M with 8 beds. Inpatient care is provided in the areas of orthopedics, surgery, and plastic surgery.  


Corporate Health and Social Management 
The Corporate Health and Social Management department is an independent department within the HR division. It is responsible for implementing a standardized health management system in consideration of scientific findings and through the use of modern tools and methods.  
 

Occupational Health & Safety
In addition to Flughafen München GmbH, the Occupational Health & Safety division also oversees all subsidiaries (except for MediCare and AeroGround Berlin) as well as multiple external companies on the campus. In order to comply with the legal requirement (Occupational Safety Act) of «linking occupational safety with the management of an organization», the senior specialist for occupational health and safety reports all health and safety issues directly to the Chair of the Executive Board.  
 
For accident reporting and analysis purposes, all relevant data is logged in a central IT system, EcoWebDesk, where it can be accessed for further evaluation. This allows FMG to derive and implement measures and verify their effectiveness, which creates meaningful accident statistics.  
 
Process reviews are conducted as required on the basis of legal and operational requirements in order to maintain high quality in occupational safety and health protection. In addition, internationally recognized indicators are included in this evaluation, which permits comparisons with other international airports. Information on the lost-time incident rate will therefore also be collected in the future. Apart from the ongoing KPI-based evaluations, consultations with stakeholders (e.g., works councils and occupational medicine) provide trend-setting insight for process optimization.     
 

Members of the works council are permanent representatives on the health and safety committee.  
The voice of the employee is a valuable factor in corporate decisions. Employees have numerous opportunities to get involved in committees that are required by law or other working groups, i.e. the Supervisory Board, Youth and Trainees Council, Council for Employees with Disabilities, company health management working group, or company sports club.    
  
Members of the works council (trade union representatives) are permanent representatives on the health and safety committee. Most of the overarching regulations in the company culminate in works agreements with the works council, which currently has 31 members. In recent years, employee representatives have worked together with the employer to conclude important company agreements, for example in relation to home and mobile offices, employee reviews, and the promotion of professional qualification.    
 
Company agreements are concluded between the employer and the works council and impact directly on the working conditions of employees. They represent binding standards for all employees of a company.

Key Performance Indicator GRI SRS-404-1: Average hours of training
The reporting organization shall report the following information:

a. Average hours of training that the organization’s employees have undertaken during the reporting period, by:
i. gender;
ii. employee category.

Average training hours1)    
  20182)  
  Group FMG
Average hours of training per employee 15.9 9.2
Per male employee 16.6 9.6
Per female employee 14.3 7.9
Per manager3) 16.1 12.6
Per employee (without managerial responsibilities) 15.9 8.9
1)Average number of hours spent on professional development, training, and seminars (excluding aviation security courses) per employee (excluding apprentices, employees in minor employment, temporary workers, and interns) as at December 31. 
 

2)Excluding LabCampus, MUCreal, FM Bau and Infogate 
 

3)First- to fourth-tier managers excluding the Executive Board of FMG 

Key Performance Indicator GRI SRS-405-1: Diversity
The reporting organization shall report the following information:

a. Percentage of individuals within the organization’s governance bodies in each of the following diversity categories:
i. Gender;
ii. Age group: under 30 years old, 30-50 years old, over 50 years old;
iii. Other indicators of diversity where relevant (such as minority or vulnerable groups).

b. Percentage of employees per employee category in each of the following diversity categories:
i. Gender;
ii. Age group: under 30 years old, 30-50 years old, over 50 years old;
iii. Other indicators of diversity where relevant (such as minority or vulnerable groups).

Age structure of employees            
Group 2018          
   Women Proportion in %2)  Men Proportion in % 2)  Total Proportion in % 2)
Age structure of employees1)            
Under 30 years 632 6.57 900 9.35 1,532 15.92
30 to 50 years 1,762 18.30 3,260 33.87 5,022 52.17
Over 50 years 796 8.27 2,276 23.64 3,072 31.91
Total 3,190 33.14 6,436 66.86 9,626 100.00
             
FMG 2018          
   Women Proportion in % 2)  Men Proportion in % 2)  Total Proportion in % 2)
Age structure of employees1)            
Under 30 years 221 5.09 250 5.75 471 10.84
30 to 50 years 564 12.98 1,477 33.99 2,041 46.97
Over 50 years 236 5.43 1,597 36.75 1,833 42.19
Total 1,021 23.50 3,324 76.50 4,345 100.00
1)Reporting date: 31.12.: excluding apprentices, workers in minor employment, temporary workers, interns 
 
 
2)All percentages are based on the total number of employees as per 1).


Total number of employees (Group): 9,986

Total number of employees (FMG): 4,407


Managers1)    
Group 2018  
    Proportion in %
Total managers 732 7.60 1)
Women 174 1.81 1)
Men 558 5.08 1)
Age structure of managers    
Under 30 years 31 4.23 2)
30 to 50 years 373 50.96 2)
Over 50 years 328 44.81 2)
     
FMG 2018  
    Proportion in %
Total managers 412 9.48 1)
Women 61 1.40 1)
Men 351 8.08 1)
Age structure of managers    
Under 30 years 5 1.21 2)
30 to 50 years 61 39.08 2)
Over 50 years 246 59.71 2)
1) Reporting date December 31: Proportion of managers relative to the total number of employees. 
 

2) Proportion of managers relative to the total number of managers.



Employing disabled employees  
Group 2018
Number of employees with limiting disabilities1) 698
Proportion of disabled staff in %2) 6.99
   
FMG 2018
Number of employees with limiting disabilities1) 488
Proportion of disabled staff in %2) 10.94
 1)Degree of disability of at least 30 within the meaning of equality under Book IX of the Social Security Code 
 

2)Proportion of employees with disabilities as per  1) based on the average total employees, including apprentices and workers in minor employment and excluding temporary workers and interns. 2017 excluding HSD. From 2018 excluding MAI, InfoGate, LabCampus, and MUCreal



Nationalities1)        
Group 2018      
  Women Men Total Proportion in %2)
Employee nationalities, overall picture 3,331 6,572 9,903  
German nationals 2,633 4,880 7,513 75.87
Foreign nationals 698 1,692 2,390 24.13
         
FMG 2018      
  Women Men Total Proportion in % 2)
Employee nationalities, overall picture 1,090 3,409 4,499  
German nationals 1,036 2,994 4,030 89.58
Foreign nationals 54 415 469 10.42
1)Reporting date: December 31: Total workforce including apprentices, excluding workers in minor employment, temporary workers, and interns. 
 

2)ll percentages are based on the total number of employees as per 1).


 

Key Performance Indicator GRI SRS-406-1: Incidents of discrimination
The reporting organization shall report the following information:

a. Total number of incidents of discrimination during the reporting period.

b. Status of the incidents and actions taken with reference to the following:
i. Incident reviewed by the organization;
ii. Remediation plans being implemented;
iii. Remediation plans that have been implemented, with results reviewed through routine internal management review processes;
iv. Incident no longer subject to action.

There were no reported cases of discrimination during the reporting period.
Industry-specific additions

Occupational illnesses1)    
  2018 2018
In % Group 2) FMG
Reported occupational illnesses 4 4
1) Including apprentices, excluding workers in minor employment, temporary workers, and interns 
 
 
2) Excluding eurotrade


Occupational health and safety  
Group 1) 2018
Accident statistics 3)  
Reportable occupational accidents 231
Resulting days of absence4) 5,820
Fatal occupational accidents6) 0
Rate per 1,000 workers4) 26.55
   
Workers in ground handling Munich5) 2018
Accident statistics 2)  
Reportable occupational accidents 101
Resulting days of absence3) 2,900
Fatal occupational accidents 0
Rate per 1,000 workers4) 49.49
   
FMG1) 2018
Accident statistics 2)  
Reportable occupational accidents 84
Resulting days of absence3) 2,464
Fatal occupational accidents 0
Rate per 1,000 workers4) 26.55
Workers in ground handling in Berlin5) 2018
Accident statistics 3)  
Reportable occupational accidents 26
Resulting days of absence3) 741
Fatal occupational accidents 0
Rate per 1,000 workers4) 55.13
1)Including apprentices, workers in minor employment, temporary workers, and interns. 
 

2)Injuries requiring first aid are also recorded whenever employees attend Munich Airport’s medical center. 
 

3)These are calendar days and are counted from the day following the work accident. 
 
 
4)Reportable occupational accidents * 1,000 / annual average actual employee capacity (EC). 
 

5)Ground handling employees working for FMG and employees and temporary workers at AeroGround. 
 

6)In 2018, a fatal work accident occurred at Munich Airport. As the person in question was an employee of a third company, the accident is not included in these statistics.

17. Human Rights

The company discloses what measures it takes, strategies it pursues and targets it sets for itself and for the supply chain for ensuring that human rights are respected globally and that forced and child labour as well as all forms of exploitation are prevented. Information should also be provided on the results of the measures and on any relevant risks.

The Munich Airport Group’s business operations are primarily confined to Germany. Here, human rights are enshrined in law.  In calls for tender for international services, it is ensured that national and international laws and agreements are applied. This is documented again when contracts are signed. When choosing its business partners, the subsidiary Munich Airport International GmbH (MAI), which is active abroad, performs a sanction list review and a detailed due diligence review. 
 
Munich Airport adopted the national action plan for business and human rights of the Federal Government at the end of 2018. Within this framework, it has initiated and examined the potential risks and response to human rights issues in the different areas of the company that may be affected in this regard. An initial evaluation and summary is expected in summer 2019. Within this framework, a review process is planned for the risk analysis and a stipulation of the resultant risks in the risk management system for fiscal year 2019. 


Legal provisions in respect of procurement
The Munich Airport Group, a sectoral contracting entity, operates in the field of «Ports and Airports» As such, it ensures its procurement policy is consistent with public procurement legislation. Where public contracts are involved, calls for tenders are issued on a Europe-wide basis in keeping with the binding regulations under procurement law. The Group normally puts contracts that are not subject to public procurement legislation to tender based on a formal process.  


Supplier management
In 2018, Flughafen München GmbH assessed around 150 of its framework agreement partners according to the following criteria: The quality of the product or service, reliability of delivery, service and price trends, as well as the company’s certification according to quality and environmental standards. In the event of poor outcomes, the suppliers were given the opportunity to eliminate existing deficiencies in supplier audits. As the suppliers are in existing contractual relationships and thus in constant communication with the relevant divisions, the shortcomings are addressed directly and remedied. Where the shortcoming was not remedied, a notice of defects would be issued. Where a supplier’s performance is consistently poor or if shortcomings are not permanently remedied, there is no further call obligation in the case of framework agreements and individual measures with phased call-offs. Of the companies supplying Munich Airport, 98 percent are headquartered in Germany. Of these, 61 percent are from Bavaria, and 38 percent are from Munich and the area surrounding the airport.  


Compliance management system
Compliance covers compliance with all airport-related laws, specifications and regulations, national and international rules and standards, and in-house rules and guidelines. Munich Airport has established a Group-wide compliance management system, which encompasses all organizational provisions ensuring compliance with the aforementioned rules. The Compliance department submits reports on the current status of the compliance management system to the Executive Board on a regular basis and to the Supervisory Board on an annual basis.  


Further information: Outlook: Risks and opportunities report  


Elimination of child labor 
The Munich Airport Group’s compliance with statutory regulations means that there is no risk of incidents of child labor in connection with the Group’s business activities in relation to the employment of its own workers. When hiring employees, for example, the Group complies with the minimum age requirements set by national statutes.  Munich Airport Group complies with statutory regulations and provisions. This is based on the applicable legislation and legal framework. When sourcing product groups where the likelihood of child labor is high, steps are taken to ensure that none is involved. Manufacturers of high-risk products in areas known to use child labor are required to present independent certification that they do not. Clauses to this effect are integrated in the calls for tenders and awards documentation. Thus, for example, in the call for tender pertaining to uniforms, a provision was included that the contractor must guarantee compliance with ethical obligations (no child labor, environmentally-sustainable manufacture and processing of substances and materials, healthy working conditions in the workplace at the manufacturers). Furthermore, bidders were required to submit a declaration regarding compliance with the ILO core labor standards.  


Elimination of forced labor
The Munich Airport Group rejects all forms of forced labor.Munich Airport Group complies with statutory regulations and provisions. This is based on the applicable legislation and legal framework. During the reporting period, no activities were identified as having the risk of forced or involuntary labor. For the procurement of supplies and services in which the problem of forced labor could be a factor, the contractors must commit to comply with national and international laws and agreements on the prohibition of forced or involuntary labor.  


Employee training on human rights
At FMG, information that must be available on an ongoing basis according to the German General Equal Treatment Act is published on the Intranet and issued through management. Managers, in particular, receive regular training.  


Sustainability issues in the supply chain
The Munich Airport Group’s business operations are confined to Germany .Here, human rights are enshrined in law. In calls for tender, the Group makes sure that national and international laws and agreements are applied. This is reaffirmed in legally binding form when contracts are signed. With a total procurement volume1) of around 750 million euros in 2018, the Munich Airport Group is an attractive and reliable client in the region. Orders are distributed across 139 product groups from sectors including construction, supplies, and services. A party submitting a tender must confirm it complies with the statutory provisions in order to rule out anything that would prevent it taking part in public procurement or tendering procedures. Those submitting tenders must also provide evidence that they comply with the standards relating to quality assurance and environmental management. The top priority when commissioning products or services is to draw up agreements that satisfy environmental, social, and economic requirements. (Legal basis: Section 21 SektVO (Sector Ordinance), Section 7 SektVO) For example, in the case of the new tender for uniforms 2016/2017 for approximately 2,000 employees of Flughafen München GmbH, compliance with the minimum criteria with respect to ethical standards and ecological and human-ecological requirements for substances and materials was a component of the performance specification. The Munich Airport Group awards contracts on the basis of cost-effectiveness and places particular emphasis on the utilization of materials and products that are both durable and use low levels of natural resources. For investment goods, any subsequent costs for servicing and maintenance (life cycle costs) are also considered, where necessary.The Group is mainly supplied by business partners in the region, which helps reduce transportation distances and CO2 emissions.
For example, Allresto purchases food worth almost 20 million euros each year – nearly all of which originates from Bavaria, and a good 50 percent of which comes from the area directly around the airport.   The processing of predominantly regional and seasonal products is an important criterion for cooperation with the airport. Aspects such as short journey and delivery distances and the sustainability of procurement also play an important role in the selection of suppliers and business partners.   
 
Further information: Outlook: Risks and opportunities report 
 
1) The figures relate to the total procurement volume of the Munich Airport Group in 2018.

Key Performance Indicators to criteria 17

Key Performance Indicator GRI SRS-412-3: Investment agreements subject to human rights screenings
The reporting organization shall report the following information:

a. Total number and percentage of significant investment agreements and contracts that include human rights clauses or that underwent human rights screening.

b. The definition used for ‘significant investment agreements’.

The Munich Airport Group’s business operations are primarily confined to Germany. Here, human rights are enshrined in law. In calls for tender for international services, it is ensured that national and international laws and agreements are applied.  This is documented again when contracts are signed. When choosing its business partners, the subsidiary Munich Airport International GmbH, which is active abroad, performs a sanction list review and a detailed due diligence review.  

Key Performance Indicator GRI SRS-412-1: Operations subject to human rights reviews
The reporting organization shall report the following information:

a. Total number and percentage of operations that have been subject to human rights reviews or human rights impact assessments, by country.

As part of the national action plan (NAP) for business and human rights, an internal risk analysis was initiated at the end of 2018 in the form of one-on-one discussions. The intention is to establish a process within Flughafen München GmbH in 2019 following conclusion of this analysis and its related evaluation. Integration of human rights into Munich Airport’s general opportunities/risk analyses indicates the importance of the topic in the company. 

Key Performance Indicator GRI SRS-414-1: New suppliers subject to social screening
The reporting organization shall report the following information:

a. Percentage of new suppliers that were screened using social criteria.

Legal provisions in respect of procurement
The Munich Airport Group, a sectoral contracting entity, operates in the field of «Ports and Airports». As such, it ensures its procurement policy is consistent with public procurement legislation. Where public contracts are involved, calls for tenders are issued on a Europe-wide basis in keeping with the binding regulations under procurement law. The Group normally puts contracts that are not subject to public procurement legislation to tender based on a formal process.  


Supplier management
In 2018, Flughafen München GmbH assessed around 150 of its framework agreement partners according to the following criteria: The quality of the product or service, reliability of delivery, service and price trends, as well as the company’s certification according to quality and environmental standards. In the event of poor outcomes, the suppliers were given the opportunity to eliminate existing deficiencies in supplier audits. As the suppliers are in existing contractual relationships and thus in constant communication with the relevant divisions, the shortcomings were addressed directly and remedied (audit). Where the shortcoming was not remedied, a notice of defects would be issued. Where a supplier’s performance is consistently poor or if shortcomings are not permanently remedied, there is no further call obligation. Of the companies supplying Munich Airport, 97 percent are headquartered in Germany. Of these, 54 percent are from Bavaria and 34 percent are from Munich and the area surrounding the airport. 

Key Performance Indicator GRI SRS-414-2: Social impacts in the supply chain
The reporting organization shall report the following information:

a. Number of suppliers assessed for social impacts.

b. Number of suppliers identified as having significant actual and potential negative social impacts.

c. Significant actual and potential negative social impacts identified in the supply chain.

d. Percentage of suppliers identified as having significant actual and potential negative social impacts with which improvements were agreed upon as a result of assessment.

e. Percentage of suppliers identified as having significant actual and potential negative social impacts with which relationships were terminated as a result of assessment, and why.

There are no known cases of negative impacts on human rights in the supply chain for the 2018 reporting year .

18. Corporate Citizenship

The company discloses how it contributes to corporate citizenship in the regions in which it conducts its core business activities.

Employer With its 9,986 employees¹), Munich Airport Group is the second-largest employer at the site after Deutsche Lufthansa AG. The neighboring Freising job center region, which also covers the Dachau, Ebersberg, and Erding districts, has one of the lowest levels of unemployment in Germany, at two percent on average. This corresponds to almost full employment and reflects the huge importance of Munich Airport for the regional labor market. The airport provides one in four of all employment relationships liable for social security contributions in the districts of Freising and Erding.
¹) Including apprentices  

The airport and its regional projects  
Good cooperation with the region is essential if Munich Airport is to be successful, and the Regional Liaison Office is responsible for this. As a support office, it reports directly to the Executive Board and sees itself as a kind of bridge-builder between the airport and the region. For the municipalities, political decision-makers, institutions, and citizens, the Regional Liaison Office is the first port of call for questions relating to the airport.   Munich Airport always endeavors to be a good neighbor and is very aware of its social responsibility within the region. In the past year, funds and resources were provided to more than 750 projects, which can be attributed to the airport’s five sponsorship pillars: education, social affairs, sport, culture, and nature. In 2018, numerous associations, in which employees themselves were active on a voluntary basis, received financial support through the «regional sponsorship of employee initiatives». Thus, for example, many voluntary fire departments were able to buy additional equipment, sports clubs were able to buy much needed training supplies, and community initiatives were promoted. In 2017, the airport launched its «NachWuchsWald» (new talent forest) project: In future, for every new-born child of an FMG employee, a tree will be planted in the Kranzberger Forest outside Freising. The next planting event is scheduled for 2019. Munich Airport once again lent its support in 2018 to many projects aimed at promoting the personal development and talents of children and young people, and at helping them in their choice of career. Donations and sponsorship

Cooperation with the region
is essential,with open and honest dialog with the surrounding communities playing a key role. As well as being a major employer, an engine for the economy, and a gateway to the world, FMG’s daily challenge is to be a responsible neighbor – in an open dialog and with commitment to the region.The Group cultivates long-term, mutual relationships with key stakeholders in its bid to generate a feeling of trust and acceptance in the society around the airport. Here, we place particular focus on our neighboring communities and political representatives. It is planned to continue speaking personally to local and political representatives in the airport region in 2019. The key elements of our dialog are:   These are some examples:  

«SchuleWirtschaft» working group for schools and businesses In the «SchuleWirtschaft» working group, Flughafen München GmbH works alongside principals from local schools, other regional businesses, specialist tradespeople, and representatives from the employment agency. The stated aim of this voluntary network is to make the transition from school to working life easier for young people.

 «Jugend forscht» (youth research) at the airport As a mentor and one of the organizers of the regional research competition for young people «Jugend forscht – Schüler experimentieren», Munich Airport supports up-and-coming talent in the fields of mathematics, IT, science, and technology (MINT). At the event held in February 2019 under the slogan «Frag nicht mich. Frag dich» (Don’t ask me, ask yourself), some 125 young inventors took part, presenting 68 projects from MINT subject areas.  

The Flughafenverein – Help without borders
For three years now, the Flughafenverein has borne the «DZI Seal of Approval», evidence that an association handles all of its donations carefully and responsibly. As well as making a number of anonymous donations and helping sick children’s dreams come true, the airport’s charitable association also supports local young people, senior citizens, and refugees, as well as regularly taking part in projects outside Germany. For instance, it has already transported around 12 tonnes of charitable donations to Latvia, for the ninth time. In cooperation with AeroGround and FMG, the association also organized the donation and handover of three decommissioned apron buses to Ghana, Romania, and Poland in 2018. In summer 2018, the Flughafenverein donated medical equipment and 200 folding beds for the victims of the wildfires in Greece. An aid project near the Turkish coastal town of Ayvalik also captured hearts and minds in 2018. Families and orphans are living there under the most difficult conditions. The Munich Flughafenverein donated food and hygiene products as well as school supplies. The project will be continued in 2019. The association also continued its commitment to Ukraine, sending a truck fully loaded with hospital beds, medical equipment, and devices to the Eastern European state.

Regional delivery chain
Around 5,100 suppliers work for the Munich Airport Group. Of the companies supplying Munich Airport, 98 percent are headquartered in Germany. Of these, 61 percent are from Bavaria, and 38 percent are from Munich and the area surrounding the airport.The Group is mainly supplied by business partners in the region, which helps reduce transportation distances and CO2 emissions. For example, Allresto purchases food worth almost 20 million euros each year – nearly all of which originates from Bavaria, and a good 50 percent of which comes from the area directly around the airport.


Value creation:

Economic benefits
Munich Airport has regional economic impact at a number of different levels. A basic distinction is made between the effects resulting directly from airport operations on the one hand and the effects of its use on the other. The value-added effects generated by airport operations can be categorized into direct, indirect, and induced effects.

Direct effects: All value created by Munich Airport’s economic activities. The direct value created is used to pay salaries and wages.

Indirect effects: The sum of all effects in a region, which are generated by the supplier and service relationships of the companies at Munich Airport.

Induced effects: Economic activities with a value-added effect in the region which are generatedby purchases made using income at Munich Airport.  
 

Effects resulting from the use of Munich Airport are known as location effects. These include positive economic effects, such as an increase in productivity and investments, plus a high level of employment and innovation. Proximity to the airport is seen as an important criterion for companies deciding to settle in the area. The airport also offers advantages for the tourism industry.

Further information:
Stakeholder dialog

Key Performance Indicators to criteria 18

Key Performance Indicator GRI SRS-201-1: Direct economic value generated and distributed
The reporting organization shall report the following information:

a. Direct economic value generated and distributed (EVG&D) on an accruals basis, including the basic components for the organization’s global operations as listed below. If data are presented on a cash basis, report the justification for this decision in addition to reporting the following basic components:
i. Direct economic value generated: revenues;
ii. Economic value distributed: operating costs, employee wages and benefits, payments to providers of capital, payments to government by country, and community investments;
iii. Economic value retained: ‘direct economic value generated’ less ‘economic value distributed’.

b. Where significant, report EVG&D separately at country, regional, or market levels, and the criteria used for defining significance.

Value generation  
Group in € million 2018
Revenue 1,508.8
+ Miscellaneous other revenues 44.9
Total revenue 1,553.7
+ Income from investments 1.8
- Non-personnel expenses -507.9
- Depreciation and amortization -215.9
= Value generated 831.7



Value distribution  
Group in € million 2018
Employees 507.7
Lenders (netted) 102.7
Public sector 72.6
Munich Airport Group 148.7
   
= Value generated 831.7

19. Political Influence

All significant input relating to legislative procedures, all entries in lobby lists, all significant payments of membership fees, all contributions to governments as well as all donations to political parties and politicians should be disclosed by country in a differentiated way.

Munich Airport is 100 percent publicly owned. The shareholders, i.e. the Federal Republic of Germany (26%), the Free State of Bavaria (51%), and the City of Munich (23%), exert a material influence over Munich Airport through their political activities.

See also Boards of the Company.  


The internal Political Affairs support office represents the interests of Munich Airport at EU, national and state level with the aim of improving the political, economic, and legal framework conditions and of maintaining the international competitive standing of the Munich Airport Group. The focus is on relevant institutions of the European Union, the German Federal Government and Parliament, the Bavarian State Government and Parliament, and Munich City Council. In addition to the efforts to maintain continuous contact and ongoing exchange of information, there are also regular information and discussion events in Brussels, Berlin, and Munich. Furthermore, representatives from the Munich Airport Group take part in specialist committees and working groups set up by industry associations, such as the German Airports Association (ADV), the German Aviation Association (BDL), or the Airport Council International (ACI). FMG is listed in the EU’s transparency register.

A variety of current and planned legislative processes at European and national level affect Munich Airport directly or indirectly. These include regulatory projects, which affect competition between the airlines, competition in the ground handling service, the awarding of take-off and landing rights, the definition of airport charges, the handling of unmanned flying objects (drones) or even the potential abolition of summer time. Bilateral agreements are also highly significant for Munich Airport, for example in relation to granting traffic rights between Germany and non-EU states and not least regulating relationships between Germany and the EU member states and the United Kingdom following BREXIT.  

Key Performance Indicators to criteria 19

Key Performance Indicator GRI SRS-415-1: Political contributions
The reporting organization shall report the following information:

a. Total monetary value of financial and in-kind political contributions made directly and indirectly by the organization by country and recipient/beneficiary.

b. If applicable, how the monetary value of in-kind contributions was estimated.

As a matter of principle, Flughafen München GmbH does not make any financial contributions of any kind to politicians, political parties, or institutions associated with these.

20. Conduct that Complies with the Law and Policy

The company discloses which measures, standards, systems and processes are in place to prevent unlawful conduct and, in particular, corruption, how they are verified, which results have been achieved to date and where it sees there to be risks. The company depicts how corruption and other contraventions in the company are prevented and exposed and what sanctions are imposed.

Compliance management system Compliance covers compliance with all airport-related laws, specifications and regulations, national and international rules and standards and in-house rules and guidelines. Munich Airport has established a Group-wide compliance management system, which encompasses all organizational provisions ensuring compliance with the aforementioned rules. The Compliance department submits reports on the current status of the compliance management system to the Executive Board on a regular basis and to the Supervisory Board on an annual basis. Compliance risks are also communicated as part of the risk reporting to the Executive Board and shareholders if internal thresholds are exceeded. Regular dialog takes place between Risk Management and Compliance.  

Identifying and mitigating compliance risks The Compliance department prepares the compliance risk analysis with input from the divisions and combines it with the subsidiaries’ compliance risk analyses every year. Compliance risks are assessed in the same way as the risk management process. Once the compliance risk analysis has been carried out, the Executive Board is notified of the results in a report. The annual Compliance report to the Supervisory Board of FMG also includes the results of the compliance risk analysis. If there is an elevated loss potential and concomitant high probability of occurrence despite all the countermeasures taken, a detailed description is provided in the report. In respect of 2018, there were no elevated compliance risks after the countermeasures taken were considered.

Preventing corruption The compliance guidelines and the guidelines covering gifts and invitations support managers and employees in ensuring legally compliant and ethical behavior at the workplace. They are published on the Intranet and are therefore available to all employees. The guidelines also reference other guidelines with which employees must comply, thus for example ensuring compliance with public procurement law with regard to procurement and contracting processes, data protection, and information security. These ensure that processes and procedures are transparent and traceable, both internally and externally.The position of anti-corruption officer is exercised by the head of the Compliance department.  Public contracts include the procurement of services involving supplies, construction, and services. European public procurement legislation according to GWB and SektVO must be applied to procurement contracts of Flughafen München GmbH if the prerequisites from the following legal foundations exist:


Flughafen München GmbH then generally performs a Europe-wide, two-stage negotiation procedure with competitive bidding (suitability test). If the scope of application of the public procurement legislation is not established – for example, because the threshold value for Europe-wide award procedures is not reached – Flughafen München GmbH conducts a national invitation to tender. Only internal regulations apply here. The aim of these is to award contracts to the most competitive bidder. Public procurement legislation does not apply. For FMG, the following award principles on the basis of Section 97 GWB apply, inter alia: 


Principle of open competition
As many bidders as possible are to be given the opportunity to make their bid in a formal procedure.  


Principle of transparency
All bidders are to be given the same information. Where an award procedure is ongoing, the type of procedure may not be changed.


Principle of equality/ban on discrimination
All bidders are to be treated equally. Awarding contracts in lots – large contracts are to be divided into individual specialist and partial lots, in order to give small and medium-sized companies the opportunity to apply within the framework of their performance ability.  


Profitability requirement
The contract is to be awarded to the most economically advantageous bid. Given the legal requirements on the airport as a sectoral contracting entity, no «locality bonus» may be granted to companies from the immediate or nearby vicinity when awarding contracts.  


Awarding concessions
More details on the application of the Law governing the Awarding of Concession Contracts can be provided on request by the central contact partners.  

Key Performance Indicators to criteria 20

Key Performance Indicator GRI SRS-205-1: Operations assesed for risks related to corruption
The reporting organization shall report the following information:

a. Total number and percentage of operations assessed for risks related to corruption.

b. Significant risks related to corruption identified through the risk assessment.

The position of anti-corruption officer is exercised by the head of the Compliance department. There were no confirmed cases of corruption in 2018. FMG’s code of conduct contains corporate policies on legally-compliant and ethical behavior for employees and managers. It is published on the Intranet and contains regulations on dealing with gifts/financial contributions, granting benefits to third parties, carrying out secondary jobs, and awarding contracts. It also contains references to the observance of further guidelines. The purpose of these rules is to ensure that proper procedures are followed in connection with procurement and the awarding and handling of contracts.

Key Performance Indicator GRI SRS-205-3: Incidents of corruption
Die berichtende Organisation muss über folgende Informationen berichten:

a. Total number and nature of confirmed incidents of corruption.

b. Total number of confirmed incidents in which employees were dismissed or disciplined for corruption.

c. Total number of confirmed incidents when contracts with business partners were terminated or not renewed due to violations related to corruption.

d. Public legal cases regarding corruption brought against the organization or its employees during the reporting period and the outcomes of such cases.

There were no confirmed cases of corruption in 2018.

Key Performance Indicator GRI SRS-419-1: Non-compliance with laws and regulations
The reporting organization shall report the following information:

a. Significant fines and non-monetary sanctions for non-compliance with laws and/or regulations in the social and economic area in terms of:
i. total monetary value of significant fines;
ii. total number of non-monetary sanctions;
iii. cases brought through dispute resolution mechanisms.

b. If the organization has not identified any non-compliance with laws and/or regulations, a brief statement of this fact is sufficient.

c. The context against which significant fines and non-monetary sanctions were incurred.

Munich Airport Group complies with statutory regulations and provisions. This is based on the applicable legislation and legal framework. This is no guarantee, however, that individuals will act within the law. When a violation does occur, the incident is also investigated for the possible existence of systematic failings, and any necessary improvements are implemented.  

At the time of going to print, there were no known cases of penalties for non-compliance with laws and regulations for the reporting period.